Saint-Simonianism


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Related to Saint-Simonianism: Saint Simon the Apostle

Saint-Simonianism

(səntsɪˈməʊnɪəˌnɪzəm) or

Saint-Simonism

n
(Sociology) the socialist system advocated by the Comte de Saint-Simon
Saint-Siˈmonian n, adj
References in periodicals archive ?
19) Other artisans, such as recent migrants to Paris in the 1820s-1840s, worked in low-skilled manufacturing jobs and were attracted to early forms of socialism, such as Saint-Simonianism.
Saint-Simonianism united these apparently alleatory workers into a group, as did the act of writing the letter, and the letter they wrote presented each of them as equal in terms of interest in Saint-Simonian doctrine.
If the Civil Code and the "old world" enthroned paternal authority and the rights of property-owners at the expense of women and workers, the world of Saint-Simonianism revolved around the construction of a new social individual, a new moral law articulated by women, and a new social hierarchy.
I will return to the question of women's "nature" in Saint-Simonianism.
They offer a case study of the importance of the philanthropic societies of the Restoration and subsequently of Saint-Simonianism in the development of Charton's vocation to serve the education of the masses.
Saint-Simonianism, Young Germany and Heine's dealings with Marx and other early socialists are often mentioned but not explained.
Rather than viewing Verne exclusively through the optic of Saint-Simonianism, which has been the traditional practice of most critics, he should instead be considered within the full spectrum of fin-de-siecle utopianism" (209-10).
The fourth objective is to illustrate the ambivalent heritage of the Saint-Simonianism of some members.
Taking a semiotic approach, Serge Zenkine argues that Saint-Simonianism represented a unique, "modern religious experience" that was both rationalist and mystical.
After Enfantin's erratic actions led to a decline in Saint-Simonianism, Niboyet and others joined the rapidly developing Fourierist movement.
But the discerning reader will realize that these selections offer more opportunities to consider the motives for conversion to Saint-Simonianism, the desire for intimate, not just sexual relationships, and ideas about autobiography as collective (or gender) representation than is suggested in either interpretive essay.
Though this is outside the purview of McWilliam's book, it would be interesting to examine Cousin's lectures on Smith and German Idealism in the context of art social to show how they were important bridge-works in the development of Hegelianism into Saint-Simonianism.