Saintsbury


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Saintsbury

(ˈseɪntsbərɪ; -brɪ)
n
(Biography) George Edward Bateman. 1845–1933, British literary critic and historian; author of many works on English and French literature
References in classic literature ?
Saintsbury rightly points out, in correction of an imperfectly informed French critic of our literature) the radical distinction between poetry and prose has ever been recognized by its students, yet the imaginative impulse, which is perhaps the richest of our purely intellectual gifts, has been apt to invade the province of that tact and good judgment, alike as to matter and manner, in which we are not richer than other people.
Saintsbury has made to give technical rules of metre for the production of the true prose rhythm.
Saintsbury admits, such lines being frequent in his favourite Dryden; yet, on the other hand, it might be maintained, and would be maintained by its French critics, that our English poetry has been too apt to dispense with those prose qualities, which, though not the indispensable qualities of poetry, go, nevertheless, to the making of all first-rate poetry--the qualities, namely, of orderly structure, and such qualities generally as depend upon second thoughts.
Saintsbury is certainly right in thinking that, as regards style, English literature has much to do.
He then spent about 10 years in the Napa Valley, first as director of vineyard operations at Saintsbury winery, then as a vineyard manager for Beckstoffer Vineyards, with responsibility that included high-end Cabernet vineyards like To Kalon and Dr.
They remind us that, although Philips was "rediscovered" in the early twentieth century by George Saintsbury who "included her in the first volume of his Minor Poets of the Caroline Period' (published in 1905), it was not until "the feminist, lesbian, gay and queer critics .
George Saintsbury contends that the "ballad quatrain" is "perhaps the most definitely English--blood and bone, flesh and marrow--of all English metres.
So instead he studied law and English, the latter under George Saintsbury, at the University of Edinburgh, where he eventually won the prestigious Patterson Bursary for Anglo-Saxon translation--an early indication of his gift for languages.
En el mundo anglosajon, durante los anos Victorianos, se sono con un ideal puritano de critico ideal (pienso en un olvidado como George Saintsbury, quien lo encarno) que debia vivir retirado en el campo o en el campus, sin conocer a los autores y no teniendo con ellos otro trato que su lectura.
On the one hand, there is George Saintsbury, writing in The Cambridge History of English Literature in 1912:
Saintsbury is a Californian wine star from Carneros at the southern end of the Sonoma and Napa Valleys.
Arthur Symons grumbles that "Not even Coleridge is so uneven as De Quincey" (47), and George Saintsbury scoffs at how De Quincey's "pure rigmarole" meanders throughout his text "till the reader feels as Coleridge's auditors must have felt .