sale-leaseback

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Also found in: Financial.

sale-lease·back

(sāl′lēs′băk′)
n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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BGL Real Estate Partners is a national advisor that is specialising in providing healthcare real estate owners with tailored transaction strategies, including debt and equity recapitalisation, sale-leasebacks, partial sale-leasebacks, tax deferred transactions and a division of Brown Gibbons Lang & Company.
Buyer demand has resulted in compressed cap rates since mid-2010 for sale-leasebacks and net-lease transactions, Transwestern reported.
Sale-leasebacks are a solution that allows the company to continue to run their business without interruption," said Mr.
Typical property types that are the subject of sale-leasebacks are warehouse and distribution facilities, office buildings and medical offices.
Sale-Leasebacks are increasingly common among newspapers as they look to raise cash and have smaller space needs for downsized staff.
In a recent Webcast interview, The Real Deal's Jen Benepe sat down with Robert Freedman, CEO of commercial real estate firm GVA Williams, to discuss how a declining market sparks sale-leasebacks.
NEW YORK-The buzz among some real estate-owning retailers is sell, sell, sell, which is leading to an increase in number and growth in average deal size of sale-leasebacks, according to some retail real estate investors.
Surprisingly, most of us are not aware of options like accounts receivable financing, cash advances, private-money and hard-money lenders, asset-based lending, equipment sale-leasebacks, and unsecured loans.
Although they have been used for more than 50 years, many companies do not fully understand how sale-leasebacks work--or the benefits they can offer to corporate investors.
The Tax Court decision in Maxwell Estate further illustrates the skepticism with which sale-leasebacks involving family members are viewed.
(Subsequently JPMorgan announced a $716 million CMBS offering and the Durst Organization announced the $1.3 billion refinancing of The Bank of America Tower, the largest single-asset CMBS financing since 2008.) The report also pointed out that corporate sale-leasebacks, having gone out of style during the economic downturn, had returned because of the significant amount of equity seeking a home in real estate end improved conditions in the commercial mortgage market.
Carey, said sale-leasebacks are popular with businesses, like banks, retailers and restaurant chains, that may own a lot of individual buildings in different locations.