Salic law


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Related to Salic law: Salique law

Sa·lic law

 (sā′lĭk, săl′ĭk)
n.
1. The legal code of the Salian Franks.
2. A law, thought to derive from the code of laws of the Salian Franks, prohibiting a woman from succeeding to a throne.

Salic law

n
1. (Historical Terms)
a. the code of laws of the Salic Franks and other Germanic tribes
b. a law within this code excluding females from inheritance
2. (Historical Terms) a law excluding women from succession to the throne in certain countries, such as France and Spain
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Salic law - the code of laws of the Salian Franks and other German tribes
legal code - a code of laws adopted by a state or nation; "a code of laws"
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References in classic literature ?
Yes, yes, to the women, I know,” said Richard, “that is your Salic law.
This is followed by an analysis of Salic law and the nature of political influence that this constructed for women in France.
While the Pragmatic Sanction created by her father Charles VI was merely an acknowledgment of the possibility of female rule, it provided no symbolic framework that actually defined power as feminine, leaving artists the challenge of representing a woman ruler in a world dominated by Salic law.
For example, in discussing the relative lag in women's political representation in France and the dearth of women at the top, they fail to mention the influence of France's Salic Law, which for centuries was thought to prohibit women from inheriting the throne--though historians now suspect this claim to have been fraudulent.
Some examples include: Alcuin of York, Lombards, Donatism, Peasants, Salic Law, and more.
And yet there are some very interesting discussions in Shakespeare of the seemingly more mundane sense of geography, pertaining to place or the world in a more limited sense, such as the Salic law in Henry V or the geopolitical tensions that constrain the Denmark of Hamlet.
Henry V cannot plainly deal with the succession questions it raises, both because they are too "explosive" and because the Salic Law problem intensifies and complicates them, and so the play "performs a carefully sustained dance around them" (87).
For though Salic law prevented the empress from inheriting the throne, McQueen argues that Eugenie used the visual arts as the primary means to establish an autonomous position beyond that of consort.
Just if Salic Law had not prevented it, and Queen Victoria II, not King Edward VII, had inherited the throne of England in 1901.
In Henry V, the exigencies of bloodline and loyalty are still present bur no longer predominant: the relationship between individuals and the state is now defined by impersonal laws constituted by assemblies or, like Salic Law, validated by precedent.
What if the Salic law preventing female succession to German thrones had not applied in 1837 and Victoria had become Queen of Hanover as well as Great Britain?
Under Salic Law, women were debarred from the line of succession, but the situation was not clear-cut, for the king of France had always been a Catholic and Henry of Navarre was a Huguenot.