Salish

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Sa·lish

 (sā′lĭsh) also Sa·lish·an (-lĭ-shən)
n. pl. Salish also Salishan or Sa·lish·ans
1. A family of Native American languages of the northwest United States and British Columbia.
2. The group of Native American peoples speaking languages of the Salish family.
3. The Flathead people.

[Southern Interior Salish se'lish, Flatheads.]

Sa′lish, Sa′lish·an adj.

Salish

(ˈseɪlɪʃ) or

Salishan

n
1. (Languages) a family of North American Indian languages spoken in the northwestern US and W Canada
2. (Peoples) the Salish (functioning as plural) the peoples collectively who speak these languages, divided in Canada into the Coast Salish and the Interior Salish
3. (Languages) the Salish (functioning as plural) the peoples collectively who speak these languages, divided in Canada into the Coast Salish and the Interior Salish

Sa•lish

(ˈseɪ lɪʃ)

n., pl. -lish•es, (esp. collectively) -lish.
2.
a. a member of any of a number of Salishan-speaking peoples of the Columbia and Fraser river drainage basins.
b. the languages of these peoples.
[< Southern Interior Salish séˀliš]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Salish - a family of Mosan language spoken in northwestern United States and western CanadaSalish - a family of Mosan language spoken in northwestern United States and western Canada
Mosan - a family of Amerindian languages spoken in Washington and British Columbia
Skagit - a Salishan dialect spoken by the Skagit
2.Salish - a member of a group of North American Indians speaking a Salishan language and living on the northwest coast of North America
American Indian, Indian, Red Indian - a member of the race of people living in America when Europeans arrived
Chimakum - a member of the Salishan people living in northwestern Washington
Skagit - a member of the Salish people in northwestern Washington
References in periodicals archive ?
6) The native Salishan languages of western North America (such as Nuxalk, or Bella Coola) contain bewilderingly long clusters of voiced and unvoiced consonants without intervening vowels, thus calling into question the very notion of a syllable-based analysis of language.
Paper presented at the Fifteenth International Conference on Salishan Languages, Vancouver, BC.
In Papers from the International Conference on Salishan Languages 14, 158-172.