glycoprotein

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gly·co·pro·tein

 (glī′kō-prō′tēn′, -tē-ĭn)
n.
Any of a group of conjugated proteins having a carbohydrate as the nonprotein component.

glycoprotein

(ˌɡlaɪkəʊˈprəʊtiːn) ,

glucoprotein

or

glycopeptide

n
(Biochemistry) any of a group of conjugated proteins containing small amounts of carbohydrates as prosthetic groups. See also mucoprotein

gly•co•pro•tein

(ˌglaɪ koʊˈproʊ tin, -ti ɪn)

n.
any of a group of complex proteins, as mucin, containing a carbohydrate combined with a simple protein.
Also called gly`co•pep′tide (-ˈpɛp taɪd)
[1905–10]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.glycoprotein - a conjugated protein having a carbohydrate component
mucin - a nitrogenous substance found in mucous secretions; a lubricant that protects body surfaces
compound protein, conjugated protein - a protein complex combining amino acids with other substances
erythropoietin - a glycoprotein secreted by the kidneys that stimulates the production of red blood cells
CD4, cluster of differentiation 4 - a glycoprotein that is found primarily on the surface of helper T cells; "CD4 is a receptor for HIV in humans"
CD8, cluster of differentiation 8 - a membrane glycoprotein that is found primarily on the surface of cytotoxic T cells
lectin - any of several plant glycoproteins that act like specific antibodies but are not antibodies in that they are not evoked by an antigenic stimulus
mucoid - any of several glycoproteins similar to mucin
References in periodicals archive ?
Binding activity to salivary glycoprotein has been attributed to both the highly conserved alanine rich repeats (50,51) and the proline-rich repeating sequences (52).
Since IgG and secretory IgA may play a role in preventing bacterial adhesion to salivary glycoproteins or mucosal receptors, passive immunization and vaccine development against periodontal diseases has been attempted because of the success of passive immunization against S.
For more than a decade, Denny and his colleagues have been studying salivary glycoproteins.