salt cedar


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to salt cedar: tamarisk, Tamarisk tree

salt cedar

or salt·ce·dar (sôlt′sē′dər)
n.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Most of the fire has burned through inaccessible marshy areas, igniting cattails and salt cedar. Salt cedar burns very hot and can remain hot long after the fire appears to be out.
The way we hunt this family farm is to sit on bluffs overlooking the river bottom and watch deer as they get up from their beds in the CRP and salt cedar thickets.
Environmental Protection Agency] who has deemed them safe for use, and they have a long history of success in salt cedar eradications across Texas," said aide Michael Ruggieri.
The influence of light and heavy obstruction by vegetation was assessed by tying branches of salt cedar (Tamarix sp.) around the perimeter of tanks.
For years, a thirsty plant called tamarisk (or salt cedar) has moved into streams and rivers throughout the Southwest and squeezed out native plants, and the Grand Canyon has been hit hard.
Behind me on a strap, a six-pack of birds--a ring-neck, a wigeon, a canvasback, a redhead, a green-winged teal and greenhead--hung on the ragged stump of a short salt cedar. Similar strings, just as heavy but including bluebills, goldeneyes and sprig along with sampling of the aforementioned, lay on my gunning partners' gear.
Vegetation that consisted of inland salt grass (Disticulus stricta), sea purslane (Sesubium venucosum), saltmarsh bulrush (Scirpus paludosis), and exotic salt cedar (Tamarix) provided sparse cover (Koenen et al., 1996).
He had required some tricky tracking through crowded salt cedar and stabbing mesquite, hands and knees work in spooky-tight quarters after the seemingly perfect shot, then a finishing shot with the nasty brush grabbing at my gear and clothing.
Two casitas, tucked away under towering salt cedar and the spacious homestead house are also available at extra cost.
In the vicinity of this location only halophytes such as tamarix (salt cedar) and saltbush grow in a scattered pattern.
Louis examined desert salt cedar. In the United States, these trees--initially imported from Eurasia to shade arid plots--rank second only to purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria) as the most invasive nonnative plants.
Additionally, along the banks of the river, the native riparian vegetation has been impacted by recent invasions of exotic plant species, such as salt cedar (Tamarix sp.) and giant cane (Arundo donax), which also contribute to plant diversity along the Rio Grande.