salt cellar


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salt cellar

salt shaker
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So when she carried the toast to her aunt a little later, it was in the best gilt-edged china bowl, with a fringed napkin on the tray and a sprig of geranium lying across the salt cellar.
Tod's pie dish, and his knife and fork and mustard and salt cellar and his table-cloth that he had left folded up in the dresser--all set out for supper (or breakfast)--without doubt for that odious Tommy Brock
There were long tables covered with cloths, with big glass bottles of water at intervals, and down the centre salt cellars and bottles of vinegar.
In fact, it tasted very much as if someone had suffered a slip-up with the salt cellar in the kitchen.
There is a 17th century Dutch Nautilus shell decorated with mythological scenes, a salt cellar featuring engravings of Portuguese soldiers sourced from the African empire of Benin, and a Roman ivory canister tower with its rich maroon casing.
uk SALT CELLAR, TENBY Looking out over St Catherine's Island, the Salt Cellar's sun terrace makes a great place to relax after a hard day's walk.
Strangely, there wasn't quite enough salt in the soup, and there was no salt cellar on our table.
Just a glance at a "Five-Course Sophisticated Affair" shows exactly where to put the butter spread in relation to the salt cellar.
However complicated it may have seemed, it was pretty easy to explain the rule sitting at a table using a salt cellar, pepper pot and a couple of wine glasses.
Accessed off the inner hallway are the cellars, which have a long passageway leading past two rooms with baking oven, salt cellar and wine storage and finishing in a large room with circular end wall and fantastic vaulted ceiling supported by a tapered stone column.
The loans include Leonardo da Vinci's Portrait of an Unknown Woman (circa 1495), which is being loaned by the Musee du Louvre, Edouard Manet's The Fife Player (1866), Claude Monet's The Saint-Lazare Station (1877) to be loaned by Musee d'Orsay et de l'Orangerie, a rare salt cellar in ivory from the Benin Kingdom, from Musee du quai Branly and Henri Matisse's Still Life with Magnolia (1941) from Centre Pompidou.
Or will it be Charles' shifting of the salt cellar up the royal table, leaving the Yorks and the Wessex's below it, that causes the family row this year?