playa

(redirected from Saltflat)
Also found in: Encyclopedia.
Related to Saltflat: Salt pan

pla·ya

 (plī′ə)
n.
A nearly level area at the bottom of an undrained desert basin, sometimes temporarily covered with water.

[Spanish, from Late Latin plagia, hillside, shoreline, probably from Greek, sides, from neuter pl. of plagios, oblique, sideways; see plagio-.]

playa

(ˈplɑːjə; Spanish ˈplaja)
n
(Physical Geography) (in the US) a temporary lake, or its dry often salty bed, in a desert basin
[Spanish: shore, from Late Latin plagia, from Greek plagios slanting, from plagos side; compare French plage beach]

pla•ya

(ˈplaɪ ə)

n., pl. -yas.
the flat, central floor of a desert basin with interior drainage.
[1850–55; < Sp: shore < Late Latin plagia; see plage]

pla·ya

(plī′ə)
A dry lake bed at the bottom of a desert basin, sometimes temporarily covered with water. Playas have no vegetation and are among the flattest geographical features in the world.

playa

A Spanish word meaning shore, used to mean a flat area at the bottom of a desert basin.
Translations

playa

n (Geol) → Playa f, → Salztonebene f
References in periodicals archive ?
A rich spread of documents records and contextualizes sixteen early pieces, while key land-and body-art projects such as Landslide, 1968, Saltflat, 1969, Condensed 220 Yard Dash, 1969, and Parallel Stress, 1970, are detailed via photography, text, and video installation.
Notes on the nesting birds of the Cienega de Santa Clara saltflat, northwestern Sonora, Mexico.
Ridd PV, Stieglitz T (2002) Dry season salinity changes in arid estuaries fringed by mangroves and saltflats.
Dubai: Antonius Van Harten and his assistant Khalid Mahmoud used several traps to collect the insects from a variety of areas including mangroves, saltflats, wadis and mountain tops.
The radiocarbon dates from the two sites that cluster around 600 to 500 calBP, however, are both located away from the laterite ridge on the surface of the saltflats.
The Palacio de Sal in Bolivia is a remarkable attraction in the heart of the country's saltflats, with walls, furniture and ceilings all made of the stuff you usually sprinkle on your fish and chips.
The South American country hasn't got the infrastructure or amazing hotels but has a unique geographic structure - beautiful lagoons and 60 miles of saltflats.
The vast Uyuni saltflats sprawl more than 3,800 square miles.