Samian

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Samian

(ˈseɪmɪən)
adj
1. (Placename) of or relating to Samos or its inhabitants
2. (Peoples) of or relating to Samos or its inhabitants
n
(Peoples) a native or inhabitant of Samos
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
Nor is this serviceable to tyrants only; nor is it tyrants only who do it; for the same thing is practised both in oligarchies and democracies: for the ostracism has in a manner nearly the same power, by restraining and banishing those who are too great; and what is done in one city is done also by those who have the supreme power in separate states; as the Athenians with respect to the Samians, the Chians, and the Lesbians; for when they suddenly acquired the superiority over all Greece, they brought the other states into subjection, contrary to the treaties which subsisted between them.
And so Callimachus writes: `I am the work of that Samian who once received divine Homer in his house.
Yet their dealing with the Samians is less striking than their inability to interpret a seemingly obvious prophecy.
Finally, Aristotle is aware of the name of Aesop's master, Xanthus, in the Constitution of the Samians (Fr 573 Rose) and even refers to Aesop's death in the Constitution of the Delphians (Fr 487 Rose).
The couplet shifts abruptly into a different voice, reframing the Samians' plight in an ironic perspective (Koch, 1977:39):
Both Samians and Argives claimed that their imposing temples of Hera were at the birthplace of the queen of heaven (Olalla 2002) and at both sites, soil is thick, clayey and high in alumina (Xeralf) compared with other soils.
who was thought to be exploiting the Samians. (23) Aristotle's
After being sold to the philosopher Xanthus, Aesop repeatedly gets the better of his master and even helps him out of several jams, as when Xanthus fails to interpret a portent for the Samians. This kind of interaction between Aesop--or at least the fable tradition ascribed to him--and classical philosophy is not new.