Richardson

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Related to Samuel Richardson: Henry Fielding

Rich·ard·son

 (rĭch′ərd-sən), Henry Hobson 1838-1886.
American architect whose influential Romanesque designs include Trinity Church in Boston (1872-1877).

Richardson

, Sir Ralph David 1902-1983.
British actor noted for his strong characterizations in classic roles as well as in contemporary works, such as Harold Pinter's No Man's Land (1975).

Richardson

, Samuel 1689-1761.
English writer whose Pamela (1740) and Clarissa Harlowe (1748) helped legitimize the novel as a literary form in English.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Richardson

(ˈrɪtʃədsən)
n
1. (Biography) Dorothy M(iller). 1873–1957, British novelist, a pioneer of stream-of-consciousness writing: author of the novel sequence Pilgrimage (14 vols, 1915–67)
2. (Biography) Henry Handel. pen name of Ethel Florence Lindesay Richardson, 1870–1946, Australian novelist; author of the trilogy The Fortunes of Richard Mahony (1917–29)
3. (Biography) Sir Owen Willans. 1879–1959, British physicist; a pioneer in the study of atomic physics: Nobel prize for physics 1928
4. (Biography) Sir Ralph (David). 1902–83, British stage and screen actor
5. (Biography) Samuel. 1689–1761, British novelist whose psychological insight and use of the epistolary form exerted a great influence on the development of the novel. His chief novels are Pamela (1740) and Clarissa (1747)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Rich•ard•son

(ˈrɪtʃ ərd sən)

n.
1. Henry Hobson, 1838–86, U.S. architect.
2. Sir Ralph (David), 1902–83, English actor.
3. Samuel, 1689–1761, English novelist.
4. a city in NE Texas, near Dallas. 77,080.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Richardson - United States architect (1838-1886)Richardson - United States architect (1838-1886)
2.Richardson - British stage and screen actor noted for playing classic roles (1902-1983)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
Then, gravitating naturally to London, he earned his living by working successively for a druggist, for the novelist-printer Samuel Richardson, as a teacher in a boys' school, and as a hack writer.
She's discovered, for instance, that in old copies of Samuel Richardson's 18th-century doorstop of a novel Clarissa, the sex scenes are often well-thumbed, while long passages describing pastoral landscapes are in pristine condition.
Samuel Richardson, a printer by trade, printed the first volume and part of the second volume of the first edition of the novel (Maslen 102).
Samuel Richardson hit a hat-trick and Luke Robinson got the other goal in a 4-3 win that handed Sean Butler his first win as Boldon manager.
Charlotte Bronte's heroine is the savvy granddaughter of Samuel Richardson's Pamela (1740), who serves in turn as the grandmother for all of the Jewish brides in Naomi Seidman's The Marriage Plot: Or, How Jem Fell in Love with Love, and with Literature.
According to Hollywood Reporter, Blanchett will be seen in the world premiere of Martin Crimp's 'When We Have Sufficiently Tortured Each Other: Twelve Variations on Samuel Richardson's Pamela'.
Coolahan compares her letters with writing of servants in epistolary novels, such as Samuel Richardson's Pamela (1740), to suggest that such narratives were eminently plausible.
Sir Edward Denham, the penniless nephew of Lady Denham by her second husband, identifies with Samuel Richardson's rogue, Robert Lovelace.
IN A PIVOTAL SCENE IN Samuel Richardson's The History of Sir Charles Grandison, Harriet Byron, distracted by her "scribbling" and not yet fully dressed, is interrupted by Charlotte and Lady L, Sir Charles's sisters, who plan to force her, their "third sister," to confess that she loves their brother.
It was Samuel Richardson who "invented" the genre we call the epistolary novel, the prose narrative told in letters; and it is his novel Pamela we now designate formally as the first epistolary novel.
What sets Raff's account apart is how she turns this conventional view of quixotism on its ear by detailing how "orthodox," moralizing authors like Samuel Richardson themselves "encouraged quixotism in the reader (15).
Joseph Butler and William Warburton, respectively "philosophical super ego" and "brawling theological id" (70) of mid-century debates about the afterlife, set the stage for Samuel Richardson's tragic and comic treatments of the subject in Clarissa and Sir Charles Grandison.