sancai


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sancai

(ˈsænkaɪ)
n
(Ceramics) a colourful glaze in Chinese pottery
References in periodicals archive ?
Hsu analyzes ceramic statues representing the 16 luohans, Buddhist "worthy ones" created in Yixian, China and highly glazed in the bright colors of the sancai (tri-color) scheme.
It showcased an array of precious artefacts that included bronze works dating back to the Western Zhou dynasty, bricks from the Qin dynasty, tiles from the Han dynasty, Tang Sancai and Silk Road coins from Xi'an, as well as paintings, ethnic costumes, agar wood, tea and traditional decorations from India.
Western Zhou Dynasty bronze works, Qin brick, Han tile, Tang sancai and Silk Road coins from Xian; and, from India, paintings, ethnic clothing, agar wood, tea and decorations will be displayed.
There has been collector interest in this period since the late 19th century, usually, Berwald comments, as part of a wider focus on early Chinese ceramics, stretching from Han works to the celebrated amber, green and cream glazed sancai pieces of the Tang dynasty (618-906).
Photo: Ming Dynasty torture implements: wooden manacles, finger press, ankle press, fetters, "box-bed," interrogation baton, light and heavy flogging sticks, cangue, prisoner's card, restraining board, (Wang Qi (ed), Sancai Tuhui), reprinted in Brook ET al.
Her choice of a limited palette (cobalt blue, green, chocolate brown and white and the flowing nature of the colours, reminiscent of Chinese Sancai ware three colours, 618-907AD) results in a cohesive body of related pieces.
The sale is comprised of 160 lots, the large majority of which include Sancai burial figurals from the Tang Dynasty.
Sancai glazes first came into prominence during the Tang Dynasty, 618-907 AD.
The hallmark of Tang tomb wares is the sancai, or three-colour, lead-silicate glazes.
November Answer: Sancai, pronounced san-sigh, means "three-color" in Chinese and refers to the glaze used frequently during this time.
Among the multitude of contemporary ceramic objects, one routinely encounters the legacy of Tang dynasty sancai wares, pre-Columbian stirrup-spout vessels, 17th century Staffordshire slipware, 18th century Meissen figurines and a host of other canonical ceramic types from the pages of history.