sansculotte


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sansculotte

(ˌsænzkjʊˈlɒt; French sɑ̃kylɔt)
n
1. (Historical Terms) (during the French Revolution)
a. (originally) a revolutionary of the poorer class
b. (later) any revolutionary, esp one having extreme republican sympathies
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) any revolutionary extremist
[C18: from French, literally: without knee breeches, because the revolutionaries wore pantaloons or trousers rather than knee breeches]
ˌsanscuˈlottism n
ˌsanscuˈlottist n
References in classic literature ?
I am one of the dispossessed, a sansculotte, a proletarian, or, in simpler phraseology addressed to your understanding, a tramp.
And not a pale, characterless Sansculotte, but a Marat.
He says the sansculotte "style of the Year II" prevailed in the Army of Italy, which Napoleon famously promised riches in Italy (106).
Although Arnaud is an opportunist who wants to marry Sabina and inherit the de Sevrac estate, he speaks like a sansculotte, declaring that her father must be held accountable for the crimes of the old regime.
La masoneria, institucion propia del Antiguo Regimen, util en aquel entonces, ya no tiene razon de ser--dira Combes-- en una democracia, segun el antimasonismo de izquierdas que aflora en las sociedades populares a iniciativa de un sector del movimiento sansculotte resueltamente hostil a la masoneria (41).
The French general Dumourier and his sansculotte aide-de-camp are shown entering Holland with the mission of taking over the government of the country, but they are faced by the Dutch army, an implacable band of armed frogs, to whom the aide-de-camp exclaims: 'Aha Mon[sieu]r Grenouille.
Anne Marie Brenot y David Chacon Rodriguez, "Du sansculotte francais au sons chemisse venezuelien.
Certainly the cap was seen on other heads; the widely circulated images of Louis XVI wearing the bonnet rouge of the sansculotte is a well-known example.
She argues that a common "maternal thinking" motivated both the sansculotte women's march on Versailles in 1789 and upper-class women's charitable assistance to poor mothers in 1790: "the one ideal that most woemn from all classes held in common was their sense of responsibility for the preservation of their children and other dependents.
She cut short her hair and dressed as a Sansculotte to see if she could gain entrance to the Cafe de la Regence where all the important chess games were played.
History, in that case, feels bound to consider that starvation is starvation; that starvation from age to age presupposes much; History ventures to assert that the French Sansculotte of Ninety-three, who.