Sansei

(redirected from Sanseis)

San·sei

 (sän′sā′, sän-sā′)
n. pl. Sansei or San·seis
The US-born grandchild of Japanese immigrants to America.

[Japanese : san, three; see shamisen + sei, generation; see issei.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

sansei

(ˈsænseɪ)
n
(Anthropology & Ethnology) an American whose parents were Japanese immigrants
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

San•sei

(ˈsɑn seɪ, sɑnˈseɪ)

n., pl. -sei. (sometimes l.c.)
a grandchild of Japanese immigrants to North America. Compare Issei, Kibei, Nisei.
[1940–45; < Japanese: third generation, earlier san-seĩ < Middle Chinese]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Kids who sign up for membership are ninjas, the coaches are sanseis and the classroom is their dojo.
A partir desta data o Japao comecou a permitir a entrada dos filhos de japoneses da segunda geracao (nisseis) que passam a ter direito ao visto por tres anos e de um ano para os de terceira geracao (sanseis) ambos renovaveis.
Her article details the grass-roots political work of third-generation youth (Sanseis), who confronted the drug epidemic by launching an anti-drug offensive that addressed the immediate and practical needs of their community.
The Chicago Chapter of the Japanese American Citizen's League (JACL) was the first to encourage Sanseis to aspire to leadership positions in the 1970s; other chapters of this national organization reserved those positions for the Niseis (second generation Japanese Americans).
She was a Sansei (third generation Japanese American) who was born in Westboro, Ohio, when many other Japanese Americans of her generation were being born in internment/concentration camps elsewhere in the United States.
This article examines the grass-roots political work of Sanseis who confronted the drug epidemic by launching an anti-drug offensive that addressed the immediate and practical needs of their community.
Beyond the stigmas associated with communities of color, Niseis and Sanseis also inherited the specific disadvantages of internment, relocation, and widely circulated myths about Japanese-American disloyalty and wartime espionage.
For Sanseis coming of age during the late 1960s, these dramas dovetailed with pervasive myths celebrating Asian-American success and exceptionalism.
Yellow Brotherhood member Nick Nagatani had just returned from military service in the Vietnam War when he noticed the widespread abuse of drugs by younger Sanseis in his home neighborhood.
A Sansei Researcher Exploring "Silences" of the Past
In an effort to shield their own children from the racial hostilities that they themselves endured, Nisei parents have furthermore promoted the cultural assimilation of their own children, the Sansei (third-generation).
The children of survivors of internment camps, she explains, experience history as one of "untold stories." Sturken (1997:698) describes the Sansei as being haunted by the "silence of their parents and the sense of a memory they cannot quite narrativize." In the words of Sansei filmmaker Tajiri: