Sanskrit


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San·skrit

 (săn′skrĭt′)
n.
An ancient Indic language that is the language of Hinduism and the Vedas and is the classical literary language of India.

[Sanskrit saṃskṛtam, from neuter of saṃskṛta-, perfected, refined : sam, together; see sem- in Indo-European roots + karoti, he makes; see kwer- in Indo-European roots.]

San′skrit′ist n.
Word History: Like Latin in Europe and elsewhere, Sanskrit has been used by the educated classes in India for literary and religious purposes for over two thousand years. It achieved this status partly through a standardization that resulted from a long tradition of grammatical theory and analysis. This tradition reached its height around 500 bc in the work of the grammarian Panini, who composed an intricate and complex description of the language in the form of quasi-mathematical rules reminiscent of the rules of generative grammar in modern times. The language thus codified was called saṃskṛtam, "perfected, refined" to distinguish it from prākṛtam the "natural, vulgar" speech of ordinary people. Sanskrit thus became a fixed literary language, while Prakrit continued to develop into what are now the modern spoken languages of northern and central India, such as Hindi and Bengali.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Sanskrit

(ˈsænskrɪt)
n
(Languages) an ancient language of India, the language of the Vedas, of Hinduism, and of an extensive philosophical and scientific literature dating from the beginning of the first millennium bc. It is the oldest recorded member of the Indic branch of the Indo-European family of languages; recognition of the existence of the Indo-European family arose in the 18th century from a comparison of Sanskrit with Greek and Latin. Although it is used only for religious purposes, it is one of the official languages of India
[C17: from Sanskrit samskrta perfected, literally: put together]
ˈSanskritist n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

San•skrit

(ˈsæn skrɪt)

n.
the oldest extant Indo-Aryan language, retained in India in a codified, classical form as a language of literature, traditional learning, and Hinduism. Abbr.: Skt
[1610–20; < Skt saṃskṛta adorned, perfected]
San•skrit′ic, adj.
San′skrit•ist, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Sanskrit

1. The oldest member of the Indo-European family of languages. Its grammar was fixed before c. 400 BC.
2. An ancient language of India, considered to be sacred.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Sanskrit - (Hinduism) an ancient language of India (the language of the Vedas and of Hinduism)Sanskrit - (Hinduism) an ancient language of India (the language of the Vedas and of Hinduism); an official language of India although it is now used only for religious purposes
Hindooism, Hinduism - a body of religious and philosophical beliefs and cultural practices native to India and based on a caste system; it is characterized by a belief in reincarnation, by a belief in a supreme being of many forms and natures, by the view that opposing theories are aspects of one eternal truth, and by a desire for liberation from earthly evils
Darsana - (from the Sanskrit word for `to see') one of six orthodox philosophical systems or viewpoints on the nature of reality and the release from bondage to karma
Mimamsa - (from the Sanskrit word for `reflection' or `interpretation') one of six orthodox philosophical systems or viewpoints on ritual traditions rooted in the Vedas and the Brahmanas as opposed to Vedanta which relies mostly on the Upanishads
Vedanta - (from the Sanskrit for `end of the Veda') one of six orthodox philosophical systems or viewpoints rooted in the Upanishads as opposed to Mimamsa which relies on the Vedas and Brahmanas
Veda, Vedic literature - (from the Sanskrit word for `knowledge') any of the most ancient sacred writings of Hinduism written in early Sanskrit; traditionally believed to comprise the Samhitas, the Brahmanas, the Aranyakas, and the Upanishads
Ayurveda - (Sanskrit) an ancient medical treatise summarizing the Hindu art of healing and prolonging life; sometimes regarded as a 5th Veda
Romany - the Indic language of the Gypsies
Urdu - the official literary language of Pakistan, closely related to Hindi; widely used in India (mostly by Moslems); written in Arabic script
Hindi - the most widely spoken of modern Indic vernaculars; spoken mostly in the north of India; along with English it is the official language of India; usually written in Devanagari script
Bihari - the Indic language spoken in Bihar (and by some people in Pakistan and Bangladesh)
Magadhan - a subfamily of Indic languages
Mahratti, Marathi - an Indic language; the state language of Maharashtra in west central India; written in the Devanagari script
Gujarati, Gujerati - the Indic language spoken by the people of India who live in Gujarat in western India
Panjabi, Punjabi - the Indic language spoken by most people in Punjab in northwestern India
Sinhala, Sinhalese, Singhalese - the Indic language spoken by the people of Sri Lanka
Indic, Indo-Aryan - a branch of the Indo-Iranian family of languages
Agni - (Sanskrit) Hindu god of fire in ancient and traditional India; one of the three chief deities of the Vedas
Asvins - (literally `possessing horses' in Sanskrit) in Hinduism the twin chariot warriors conveying Surya
optative, optative mood - a mood (as in Greek or Sanskrit) that expresses a wish or hope; expressed in English by modal verbs
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
sanskrt
Sanskrit
sanskriitti
sanskrt
szanszkrit
sanskrít
サンスクリット
sanskrit
Sanskritçe

Sanskrit

[ˈsænskrɪt]
A. ADJsánscrito
B. Nsánscrito m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Sanskrit

[ˈsænskrɪt] nsanskrit m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Sanskrit

adjsanskritisch
nSanskrit nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

Sanskrit

[ˌsænskrɪt] nsanscrito
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
But that evening Jo fancied that Beth's eyes rested on the lively, dark face beside her with peculiar pleasure, and that she listened with intense interest to an account of some exciting cricket match, though the phrases, `caught off a tice', `stumped off his ground'', and `the leg hit for three', were as intelligible to her as Sanskrit. She also fancied, having set her heart upon seeing it, that she saw a certain increase of gentleness in Laurie's manner, that he dropped his voice now and then, laughed less than usual, was a little absent--minded, and settled the afghan over Beth's feet with an assiduity that was really almost tender.
Imagine, if you can, a child filled with the wonders of nature, bursting with queries and surrounded only by beasts of the jungle to whom his questionings were as strange as Sanskrit would have been.
Some media reports on Saturday had quoted Nishank allegedly saying that the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) believed Sanskrit was the most scientific language for programming in his speech at IIT, Bombay.
The Pradyumnabhyudaya (The Felicity of Pradyumna) is a Sanskrit play in five acts by King Ravivarman of Kolambapura in Kerala, who lived during the late 13th and early 14th centuries.
Muscat: An Indian national in Oman has spent the last 15 years promoting the ancient language of Sanskrit in the Sultanate, and hopes to formally introduce in language in schools in the country.
But let's not overlook the pleasure and inspiration that can be derived from Sanskrit for recreational linguistics, as exquisiteness of methods used by Indian poets in many cases surpassed the scope of present-day logology.
Lee Sum Khor, a doctoral student from Malaysia studying linguistics at the Zhejiang University, said the Sanskrit class was filled with a pure love of the ancient Indian language.
Any comment on the utility of Sanskrit in one's life unfailingly brings up quite a few laughs in my family, coupled with memories of a dear departed.
Wilsons verse translation only from which the Urdu version was prepared as the translator did not know Sanskrit although he refers to his knowledge of Marathi.
The Sanskrit Heritage Dictionary is an avatar of a Sanskrit to French Dictionary "Dictionnaire Francais de l'Heritage Sanskrit" compiled by Gerard Huet since 1994.