saola


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saola

(ˈsaʊlə)
n
a small bovine mammal, Pseudoryx nghetinhensis,native to Vietnam and Laos
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, in a single remote national preserve set aside for the saola and other rare animals, 23,000 cheap but fatally efficient wire snares were found in 2015, the most recent year tallied.
In 2012, the railway of Bong Bong Train was seriously damaged by Typhoon Saola, with landslides on several slopes along the railway, hollowed out railway track bases, and tilted train stations.
Saola was considered a severe tropical storm by JMA and a typhoon by JTWC (2).
The animals include the Burmese roofed turtle, the vaquita, the northern sportive lemur, the Javan rhino, the Cao-vit gibbon, the kakapo, the California condor, the saola, the Sumatran tiger, and the Anegada ground iguana.
Severe Tropical Storm Quedan (international name Saola) may intensify into a typhoon ahead of its exit from the Philippine area of responsibility on Saturday, the state weather bureau said.
Environmental projects to protect marine wildlife in Indonesia and a partnership with WWF in Vietnam to safeguard the habitat of the saola, a rare species of large mammal.
Table 2 lists the Froude number of every junction during peak of Typhoon Saola. We have to admit that weirs or bridges across the river may affect the water levels [38-41] and the model we use in this study cannot deal with supercritical flow.
The Annamite Mountains stretch through Laos, Vietnam and northeast Cambodia and are home to a host of unusual creatures, including the little-seen saola, one of the world's rarest large mammals.
The Last Unicorn: A Search for One of Earth's Rarest Creatures bears no relationship to the Peter Beagle fantasy of decades ago, but charts the author's quest to understand a new living species discovered in 1992 in a remote mountain range: the saola. A live saola had never been seen by a Westerner in the wild when nature writer deBuys and conservation biologist William Robichaud teamed up to search for it in central Laos.
In The Last Unicorn, nature writer William deBuys rekindles our love affair with unicorns by introducing readers to the saola. In many ways, these creatures are like unicorns, except that saola actually exist.
With a logbook-style layout and full-colour photographs, this book introduces readers to 17 of the world's 100 most endangered species, from the greater bamboo lemur to the reclusive saola. Highlighting the efforts of scientists, communities and campaign groups, it includes astonishing success stories of species that have been saved from the brink of extinction, as well as urgent cases needing immediate action.
A few years ago, he was looking for a way to study extremely rare animals called saola (SOW-la).