Sapphira


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Sapphira

(sæˈfaɪrə)
n
(Biography) New Testament the wife of Ananias, who together with her husband was struck dead for fraudulently concealing their wealth from the Church (Acts 5)
References in periodicals archive ?
Peter later in his life, in judgment, with approval from the head of the church 'Yashua' announce to Ananias and Sapphira that they would die, for lying to the Spirit of the Holy one.
Sofia, 11, Pennsylvania, lives with her mom, dad, younger brother, cat Lola, and bearded dragon Sapphira. She loves to play piano, dance, swim, and is passionate about animals, reading, and writing.
The 49-year-old from Shrewsbury, and his daughters Anastasia, aged 15, and Sapphira, aged 13, are taking on the Hugh Porter route, and have been speaking to the cycling legend himself ahead of the event.
Ready for cycle challenge - Hugh Porter with Richard Roach, Anastasia Roach, 15, and Sapphira Roach, aged 13
Indeed, one would wish the President had the power to do to them what was done to Ananias and his wife Sapphira back in the biblical times.
At Oxford University, he became the first student in its history to have his first play 'Rachel and Sapphira' performed at the Oxford Playhouse in the professional season.
beginning with the enslaved Sapphira Wade (chapter four).
(18) Reading Willa Cather's novel Sapphira and the Slave Girl, Morrison analyzes the ways in which Cather tries and fails to narrate a situation of racial power in the United States of the nineteenth century.
A particularly illuminating instance of biblical opposition to property rights is the story of Ananias and Sapphira, the central theme of which is that we have a divinely ordained duty to distribute all property in service of the "common good." In the story, the unacceptably selfish couple attempts to keep a portion of their own earnings rather than share the entirety of it with the community.
He comments on Job and on all the relevant verses relating to greed from Ecclesiastes before warning us about Ananias and Sapphira. This seems to be a good commentary on a catalogue of relevant verses rather than an argument.
It is both individual (for example, David, Ananias, Sapphira) and communal (for example, the apostate people of Israel).