Sappho


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Sap·pho

 (săf′ō) fl. c. 600 bc.
Greek lyric poet whose work, noted for its passionate and erotic celebration of the beauty of young women and men, survives only in fragments.

Sappho

(ˈsæfəʊ)
n
(Biography) 6th century bc, Greek lyric poetess of Lesbos

Sap•pho

(ˈsæf oʊ)

n.
c620–c565 B.C., Greek poet of Lesbos.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Sappho - the Greek lyric poet of LesbosSappho - the Greek lyric poet of Lesbos; much admired although only fragments of her poetry have been preserved (6th century BC)
Translations
References in classic literature ?
Sappho (that was her name) fetched a high price, even when she was no longer young.
The negro side of Sappho was uppermost when she was dying--there is the explanation.
She gulped down the Ode to Aphrodite during the Litany, keeping herself with difficulty from asking when Sappho lived, and what else she wrote worth reading, and contriving to come in punctually at the end with "the forgiveness of sins, the Resurrection of the body, and the life everlastin'.
Bax mounted the pulpit he shut up Sappho with his envelope between the pages, settled his spectacles, and fixed his gaze intently upon the clergyman.
They had quarrelled over the service, which was every bit as fine as Sappho, according to Hewet; so that Hirst's paganism was mere ostentation.
"I wrote 'em on the back of the envelope of my aunt's last letter," he said, and pulled it from between the pages of Sappho.
after all, it is not imagined Greece, dreamy, antique Sicily, but the present world about us, though mistakable for a moment, delightfully, for the land, the age, of Sappho, of Theocritus:--
For he was not one of those gentlemen who languish after the unattainable Sappho's apple that laughs from the topmost bough--the charms which
Alphonse Daudet had come also, and he had given her a copy of Sappho: he had promised to write her name in it, but she had forgotten to remind him.
Not one of these glances, nor one sigh, was lost on her; they might have been said to fall on the shield of Minerva, which some philosophers assert protected sometimes the breast of Sappho. Eugenie bowed coldly to the count, and availed herself of the first moment when the conversation became earnest to escape to her study, whence very soon two cheerful and noisy voices being heard in connection with occasional notes of the piano assured Monte Cristo that Mademoiselle Danglars preferred to his society and to that of M.
Or why should a woman liken herself to any historical woman, and think, because Sappho, or Sevigne, or De Stael, or the cloistered souls who have had genius and cultivation do not satisfy the imagination and the serene Themis, none can,--certainly not she?
The marble sculpture of the Ancient Greek poet Sappho was made by William Theed, who was patronised by Queen Victoria and Prince Albert.