Saracen


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Sar·a·cen

 (săr′ə-sən)
n.
1. A member of a pre-Islamic nomadic people of the Syrian and Arabian Deserts.
2. A Muslim, especially of the time of the Crusades.

[Middle English, from Old English, from Late Latin Saracēnus, from Late Greek Sarakēnos, ultimately from Arabic šarq, east, sunrise; see śrq in Semitic roots.]

Sar′a·cen′ic (-sĕn′ĭk) adj.

Saracen

(ˈsærəsən)
n
1. (Historical Terms) history a member of one of the nomadic Arabic tribes, esp of the Syrian desert, that harassed the borders of the Roman Empire in that region
2. (Peoples)
a. a Muslim, esp one who opposed the crusades
b. (in later use) any Arab
adj
3. (Peoples) of or relating to Arabs of either of these periods, regions, or types
4. (Art Terms) designating, characterizing, or relating to Muslim art or architecture
[C13: from Old French Sarrazin, from Late Latin Saracēnus, from Late Greek Sarakēnos, perhaps from Arabic sharq sunrise, from shāraqa to rise]
Saracenic, ˌSaraˈcenical adj

Sar•a•cen

(ˈsær ə sən)

n.
any of the Muslim opponents of the Crusaders in the Middle Ages.
[before 900; Middle English, Old English < Medieval Latin Saracēnus < Late Greek Sarakēnós Arab]
Sar`a•cen′ic (-ˈsɛn ɪk) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Saracen - (historically) a member of the nomadic people of the Syrian and Arabian deserts at the time of the Roman EmpireSaracen - (historically) a member of the nomadic people of the Syrian and Arabian deserts at the time of the Roman Empire
history - the discipline that records and interprets past events involving human beings; "he teaches Medieval history"; "history takes the long view"
nomad - a member of a people who have no permanent home but move about according to the seasons
2.Saracen - (when used broadly) any Arab
Arab, Arabian - a member of a Semitic people originally from the Arabian peninsula and surrounding territories who speaks Arabic and who inhabits much of the Middle East and northern Africa
3.Saracen - (historically) a Muslim who opposed the Crusades
history - the discipline that records and interprets past events involving human beings; "he teaches Medieval history"; "history takes the long view"
Moslem, Muslim - a believer in or follower of Islam
Translations

Saracen

[ˈsærəsn]
A. ADJsarraceno
B. Nsarraceno/a m/f

Saracen

adjsarazenisch, Sarazenen-
nSarazene m, → Sarazenin f

Saracen

[ˈsærəsn] n (History) → saraceno/a
References in classic literature ?
'I say,' remonstrated Bob Sawyer, looking in at the coach window, as they pulled up before the door of the Saracen's Head, Towcester, 'this won't do, you know.'
The host of the Saracen's Head opportunely appeared at this moment, to confirm Mr.
They were of Saracen origin, and consequently of Arabian descent; and their fine slender limbs, small fetlocks, thin manes, and easy springy motion, formed a marked contrast with the large-jointed heavy horsastic vows.
``the Saracen head of your right reverend companion has frightened out of mine the way home I am not sure I shall get there to-night myself.''
Each of them bore at his saddle-bow a bundle of darts or javelins, about four feet in length, having sharp steel heads, a weapon much in use among the Saracens, and of which the memory is yet preserved in the martial exercise called El Jerrid, still practised in the Eastern countries.
Gedge, the landlord of the Royal Oak, who used to turn a bloodshot eye on his neighbours in the village of Shepperton, sum up his opinion of the people in his own parish--and they were all the people he knew--in these emphatic words: "Aye, sir, I've said it often, and I'll say it again, they're a poor lot i' this parish--a poor lot, sir, big and little." I think he had a dim idea that if he could migrate to a distant parish, he might find neighbours worthy of him; and indeed he did subsequently transfer himself to the Saracen's Head, which was doing a thriving business in the back street of a neighbouring market-town.
The Saracens captured and pillaged Genoa nine hundred years ago, but during the following century Genoa and Pisa entered into an offensive and defensive alliance and besieged the Saracen colonies in Sardinia and the Balearic Isles with an obstinacy that maintained its pristine vigor and held to its purpose for forty long years.
"Such treachery would be unknown in the camp of the Saracen; and yet we call ourselves a Christian people!"
For hundred of year the Byzantine Empire stood as a barrier against the Saracen hosts of Asia.
Miss Betsey, looking round the room, slowly and inquiringly, began on the other side, and carried her eyes on, like a Saracen's Head in a Dutch clock, until they reached my mother.
"There is the Saracen's head of Sir Bernard Brocas," quoth he.
Mr Squeers is in town, and attends daily, from one till four, at the Saracen's Head, Snow Hill.