sox

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sox

 (sŏks)
pl.n. Informal
Socks.

sox

(sɒks)
pl n
(Clothing & Fashion) informal socks

sock1

(sɒk)

n., pl. socks or, for 1, sometimes sox.
1. a short stocking usu. reaching to the calf or just above the ankle.
2. a lightweight shoe worn by ancient Greek and Roman comic actors.
3. comic writing for the theater; comedy or comic drama. Compare buskin (def. 3).
v.t.
4. sock away, to put into savings or reserve.
5. sock in, to close up (an airport) or ground (an aircraft).
[before 900; Middle English socke, Old English socc « Latin soccus slipper]

sock2

(sɒk)

v.t.
1. to strike or hit hard.
n.
2. a hard blow.
adj.
3. socko.
[1690–1700; orig. uncertain]
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 is a major piece of legislation that has generated an enormous amount of attention by a wide range of businesses.
Many individuals in the media industry have reported The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 as "the most sweeping corporate reform legislation since the 1930's.
In a continuation of the cycle, a subsequent "New Economy" brought an economic boom, a bubble of "irrational exuberance" (as referred to by then-Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan) that inevitably burst in 2000, bringing another round of regulation, most significantly the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
The Stellent Sarbanes-Oxley Solution is designed to help companies streamline their processes for complying with the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
The speakers discussed the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 and other corporate accountability reforms such as new and pending SEC rules and NYSE and Nasdaq corporate governance reforms.
At press time, the Securities and Exchange Commission was close to naming the head of the new Public Company Accounting Oversight Board, established by the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, as well as its other four members.
ATLANTA -- Businesses that have been agitating for less stringent oversight of financial compliance regulations will get a first taste of relief in the next two weeks, when the Securities & Exchange Commission and the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board unveil a plan for streamlining the day-to-day workings of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
The commission extended the time frame for complying with internal control requirements under section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (www.
That storm consisted of the shock of Enron, WorldCom and other companies; the response of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 and the difficulty insurance companies have in providing fairly priced D&O coverage to their insureds.
The Federal Reserve Board on January 31, 2003, announced the adoption of a final role implementing several of the reporting, disclosure, and corporate governance requirements of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 for those state member banks that have a class of securities registered under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.
For proof, you need look no further than Congress's enactment earlier this year to the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, which was intended to enhance corporate responsibility (through new corporate governance and disclosure obligations), to increase auditor independence and establish greater oversight of the audit process for public companies, and to toughen the penalties for securities law fraud and other violations.