sarcophagus

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sar·coph·a·gus

 (sär-kŏf′ə-gəs)
n. pl. sar·coph·a·gi (-jī′) or sar·coph·a·gus·es
A stone coffin, often inscribed or decorated with sculpture.

[Latin, from Greek sarkophagos, coffin, from (lithos) sarkophagos, limestone that consumed the flesh of corpses laid in it : sarx, sark-, flesh + -phagos, -phagous.]
Word History: Sarcophagus, our term for a stone coffin located above ground, has a macabre origin befitting a macabre thing. Its ultimate source is the Greek word sarkophagos, "eating flesh, carnivorous," a compound derived from sarx, "flesh," and phagein, "to eat." Sarkophagos was also used in the phrase lithos ("stone") sarkophagos to denote a kind of limestone with caustic properties from which coffins were made in the ancient world. The Roman natural historian Pliny the Elder says that this stone was quarried near the town of Assos in the Troad and describes its remarkable properties as follows: "It is well known that the bodies of the dead placed in it will be completely consumed after forty days, except for the teeth." The Greek term sarkophagos could also be used by itself as a noun to mean simply "coffin." Greek sarkophagos was borrowed into Latin as sarcophagus and used in the phrase lapis ("stone") sarcophagus to refer to the same stone as in Greek. In Latin, too, sarcophagus came to be used as a noun meaning "coffin made of any material." The first known attestation of the word sarcophagus in English dates from 1601 and occurs in a translation of Pliny's description of the stone. Later, sarcophagus begins to be used in English with the meaning "stone coffin," especially in descriptions of sarcophagi from antiquity.

sarcophagus

(sɑːˈkɒfəɡəs)
n, pl -gi (-ˌɡaɪ) or -guses
a stone or marble coffin or tomb, esp one bearing sculpture or inscriptions
[C17: via Latin from Greek sarkophagos flesh-devouring; from the type of stone used, which was believed to destroy the flesh of corpses]

sar•coph•a•gus

(sɑrˈkɒf ə gəs)

n., pl. -gi (-ˌdʒaɪ, -ˌgaɪ) -gus•es.
a stone coffin, esp. one bearing sculpture, inscriptions, etc., often displayed as a monument.
[1595–1605; < Latin < Greek sarkophágos coffin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sarcophagus - a stone coffin (usually bearing sculpture or inscriptions)sarcophagus - a stone coffin (usually bearing sculpture or inscriptions)
casket, coffin - box in which a corpse is buried or cremated
Translations
sarkofág
sarkofag
sarkofagi
sarkofag
szarkofág
石棺
sarkofag
sarkofag

sarcophagus

[sɑːˈkɒfəgəs] N (sarcophaguses or sarcophagi (pl)) [sɑːˈkɒfəgaɪ]sarcófago m

sarcophagus

[sɑːrˈkɒfəgəs] [sarcophagi] [sɑːrˈkɒfəgaɪ] (pl) nsarcophage m

sarcophagus

n pl <sarcophagi> → Sarkophag m

sarcophagus

[sɑːˈkɒfəgəs] n (sarcophaguses or sarcophagi (pl)) → sarcofago
References in periodicals archive ?
La seconde salle consacree a l'art paleochretien renferme un sarcophage dit [beaucoup moins que] Les miracle du Christ [beaucoup plus grand que] decouvert a Dellys, des mosaiques et des fragments d'architectures telles que des arcs et des chapiteaux.
We collected important Diptera's species such as Lucilia sericata, Chrysomya albiceps, Musca domestica, Antomiya pluvialis, Sarcophage africa and Piophila casei which can be useful indicators of each specific decomposition stage of fwild boar and human cases as well.
Between delectable servings of blinis Demidoff (buckwheat cakes with caviar and sour cream), caille en sarcophage (literally, "quail in a sarcophagus"), and other exquisite dishes, not to mention free-flowing Veuve Clicquot champagne and Amontillado sherry, a spirit of liberation, reconciliation and gratitude takes over.
The 1987 film by Gabriel Axel made me crave: Cailles en Sarcophage -- quail in a delicate puff pastry shell with foie gras and truffle sauce.
2004): "Le sarcophage de Portonaccio et la composition de son decor", Graeco-Latina Brunensia, 9, pp.
La position du sarcophage de Barbatus indique qu'il s'agissait de la premiere depose d'un corps.
Aboutissement logique, ce misanthrope, le capitaine et dernier survivant de l'equipage du Nautilus, mourra seul et presque oublie, son vaisseau immobilise devenant son sarcophage (lui-meme renferme dans la grotte de l'ile qui s'abimera dans les profondeurs de l'ocean a la suite d'une explosion volcanique, par une sorte de mise en abyme de l'aneantissement).
Le journal a cite que la momie qui se trouve dans un tres bon etat, etait ensevelie dans un sarcophage en bois, decore de gravures hieroglyphiques.
Between scrumptious mouthfuls of Caille en Sarcophage (literally, "quail in a sarcophagus") and sips of perfectly-aged Amontillado, unexpressed love and repressed creativity find an alternative spiritual path to fulfillment; and reconciliation becomes a promise and a possibility in a community redivivus.
There are four poetry volumes, Cailles en sarcophage (1997; Quails in a coffin), Transylvanie (1998; Transylvania), Klotho (1999; Klotho), and Graine d'Antigone (2000; Antigone's Seed).
Unable to convert and assimilate her bodily memories into narrative, the narrator internalizes her suffering: 'Je devore ma propre chair: sarcophage.