Sardanapalus


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Sardanapalus

(ˌsɑːdəˈnæpələs)
n
(Biography) the Greek name of Ashurbanipal
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Captain Marsh and Famine and Pestilence the baby COYOTES, and Sour-Mash and her pups, and Sardanapalus and her kittens - hang these names she gives the creatures, they warp my jaw - and Potter: you - all sitting around in the house, and Soldier Boy at the window the entire time, it's a wonder to me she comes along as well as she does.
Some kings also have been [1312a] dethroned and killed in consequence of the contempt they were held in by the people; as some one conspired against Sardanapalus, having seen him spinning with his wife, if what is related of him is true, or if not of him, it may very probably be true of some one else.
You believe, and yet you deliver me up to him who fills and defiles the world with his heresies and debaucheries--to that infamous Sardanapalus whom the blind call the Duke of Buckingham, and whom believers name Antichrist!"
The traveller who stops at the best houses, so called, soon discovers this, for the publicans presume him to be a Sardanapalus, and if he resigned himself to their tender mercies he would soon be completely emasculated.
But provincial manners and morals obscured, little by little, the rays of this fallen Sardanapalus; these vestiges of his former luxury now produced the effect of a glass chandelier in a barn.
From the serene to the outrageous, such as The Death of Sardanapalus, this visual feast demonstrates why he was one of the most exciting artists of the 19th century.
It shows the hedonistic Sardanapalus, a fictional Assyrian king facing defeat, sitting indolently on an immense divan of rosy silk while all around, on his order, his concubines, eunuchs and horses are being put to death.
The libretto is based on Lord Byron's historic tragedy Sardanapalus, about the last king of ancient Assyria -- a region now spanning Syria and northern Iraq.
Van Rij traces Berlioz's surprisingly numerous references to bayaderes, and misses only one, in the Rome-Prize-winning cantata of 1830, when the concupiscent Sardanapalus cries out "venez, bayaderes charmantes" in a line whose musical setting one of the reviewers of the first performance found especially enchanting.
"A Poem against Idleness, and the History of Sardanapalus." A Selection from the Minor Poems of Dan John Lydgate, from Early English Poetry, Ballads, and Popular Literature of the Middle Ages.
Human conscience must thus be like "an island in the midst of the flood." The individual who will set as his first purpose in life "self-expression" and not "self-control"--will become vulnerable to any influence, so much so that his condition will become, in Babbitts's view, similar to that of Byron's Assurbanipal (the famous king of Assyria, known also by his Latin name Sardanapalus) when addressing his queen, Zarina, to reveal to her how he feels about himself: