Sargon II


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Related to Sargon II: Tiglath Pileser III

Sar·gon II

 (sär′gŏn′) Died 705 bc.
Assyrian king (722-705) who enlarged the Assyrian Empire. He completed the siege of Samaria and became king of Babylonia (710).

Sargon II

(ˈsɑːɡɒn)
n
(Biography) died 705 bc, king of Assyria (722–705). He developed a policy of transporting conquered peoples to distant parts of his empire

Sargon II


n.
died 705 B.C., king of Assyria 722–705.
References in periodicals archive ?
Meanwhile, Al-Shammari told KUNA that IS has managed to destroy historical evidence of four important historic sites in the province: Nimrud, as capital of the Assyrian empire in the 13th century BC, Nineveh, the capital of Assyrian king Sennacherib and Khorsabad, capital of King Sargon II, both in the seventh century BC, and finally (Al-Hadhar), as the capital of Arab kings in the second century AD.
Other papers on Iran discuss more general themes, such as the nature of warfare in the ancient Near East and the eighth campaign of Sargon II.
Tadmor attaches special importance here to a relief from the palace of Sargon II at Khorsabad depicting his siege of "the fortified city of Mannea," in 715 BCE.
BAGHDAD / Nina /--A local source in Nineveh province, declared that terrorist Daash elements blew up the archaeological palace of Dor Sharukin which is a touristic site built by the Assyrian king Sargon II in Mosul.
Other kings represented include Tiglath-Pileser III (744-727 BCE), Sargon II (721-705 BCE), Sennacherib (704-681 BCE), and Ashurbanipal (669-627 BCE).
They defied imperial conquests and clung to the land while much of the population of the Northern Kingdom of Israel was exiled to Assyria presently northern Iraq by King Sargon II in 722 BCE.
La segunda deportacion (2R 17,5-6; 18,11), reinando Oseas, la llevo a cabo Sargon ii (y no Salmanasar, como dice el texto biblico).
They refer to the king Sargon II (721-05) transplanted into Media a strong group of Jews, that we already could define as Medici, hardly after the fall of the reign of Samaria (721 B.
Musasir was particularly important during the first half of the 1st millennium BCE and is known primarily for reliefs and inscriptions obtained during the reign of Assyrian King Sargon II, who captured it in 714 BCE.
Archaeologists report preliminary findings from ongoing excavations at a site in Syria with material from periods ranging from Sargon II of Assyria to Medieval and later.
Sargon II maintained Assyria's conquests against a variety of powerful coalitions.
The original Palace of Sargon II walls were preserved in these sites for more than two millenniums.