Sargon of Akkad


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Sargon of Akkad

(ˈsɑːɡɒn; ˈækæd)
n
(Biography) 24th to 23rd century bc, semilegendary Mesopotamian ruler whose empire extended from the Gulf to the Mediterranean
References in periodicals archive ?
Wasn't he as barbarian as Sargon of Akkad, Genghis Khan, Tamerlane, Ghaznavi, Napoleon,, Hari Singh Nalwa or Hitler, who destroyed civilisations and killed millions in their greed to conquer one region after another?
We were also, or so we were informed, building democracy in a country that has not enjoyed the blessings of legitimate self-government since Sargon of Akkad marched through Sumeria and washed his weapons in the sea over 4,000 years ago.
Empires, in the form of institutionally structured political entities allowing a particularly strong group or power center to control other peoples or regions, have existed since the Sumerian state of Sargon of Akkad in the twenty-third century BCE.
As far back as the region's first great ruler, Sargon of Akkad (ca.
Where else, for example, are we likely to learn that the Iraqis commissioned Frank Lloyd Wright in 1957 to build Baghdad's first opera house (the job was canceled after a coup), that the early Mesopotamian ruler Sargon of Akkad started life as a landscape gardener, or that the hit series on Iraqi TV in the 1990s was Wolves of the Night, the saga of a Baghdad gang in which the individual members were portrayed as "ordinary people responding to extraordinary hardship by doing what they must to get by.
It dates from the dynasty of Sargon of Akkad, in around 2,300BC, and is the earliest map known in the sense that it shows north, south, east and west.
Gods - Sargon of Akkad (24th-23rd century BC); Pachacutec of the Incas (1438-71);
reference to Sargon of Akkad in discussion of Moses' infancy); others will seek more contemporary commentary (e.
Sargon of Akkad brought all of Babylonia under his control, and documents in the Semitic Akkadian language became commonplace there.
Furthermore, the epic describes the going through the forest as easy (SB V 5), whereas the Sargon tradition makes the forest tangled and impenetrable, and this is what was stressed by Sargon II, since he and Sargon of Akkad were trying to bring armies through it rather than just walking with one companion, as Gilgamesh was.
Millard ("History and Legend in Early Babylonia") attempts to defend the historicity of the legends about Sargon of Akkad, thereby providing an analogy to the biblical legendary tradition of, e.
Were Sargon of Akkad and his family more pious than the entourage of Gudea of Lagash?