sarong

(redirected from Sarong skirt)
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sa·rong

 (sə-rông′, -rŏng′)
n.
1. A garment consisting of a length of cloth that is wrapped around the body and tied at the waist or below the armpits, worn by men and women in Malaysia, Indonesia, and the Pacific islands.
2. A cloth of light fabric and varying length that is wrapped around the waist and tied, often worn as beachwear.

[Malay (kain) sarong, covering (cloth), sarong.]

sarong

(səˈrɒŋ)
n
1. (Clothing & Fashion) a draped skirtlike garment worn by men and women in the Malay Archipelago, Sri Lanka, the Pacific islands, etc
2. (Clothing & Fashion) a Western adaptation of this garment
[C19: from Malay, literally: sheath]

sa•rong

(səˈrɔŋ, -ˈrɒŋ)

n.
1. a loose-fitting skirtlike garment formed by wrapping a strip of cloth around the lower part of the body, worn by both sexes in the Malay Archipelago and some Pacific islands.
2. a cloth for such garments.
[1825–35; < Malay sarung, sarong]

sarong

A length of cotton worn wrapped around the waist to make a long skirt.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sarong - a loose skirt consisting of brightly colored fabric wrapped around the bodysarong - a loose skirt consisting of brightly colored fabric wrapped around the body; worn by both women and men in the South Pacific
skirt - a garment hanging from the waist; worn mainly by girls and women
Translations
السّارونج: الزِّي الوطني في المَلايو
sarong
sarong
maláj szoknya
sarong
sarongas
sarongs
sarong
dolama etekliksarong

sarong

[səˈrɒŋ] Nsarong m

sarong

[səˈrɒŋ] n (traditional Malaysian clothing)sarong m; (worn on beach)paréo m

sarong

nSarong m

sarong

[səˈrɒŋ] nsarong m inv

sarong

(səˈroŋ) (in Singapore and Malaysia sarung) noun
a kind of skirt worn by Malay men and women.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sporting a mid-nineties Donna Karan-designed ensemble, Barbie wears a black mock turtleneck, sarong skirt, fringed red shawl, black pantyhose and a classy beret.
For example, choose a basic skirt rather than a sarong skirt, which requires baby or rolled hem finishes on multiple long edges.
The words he used to describe the look that included a daffodil-yellow cashmere tank dress, a crinkly hemp linen tunic, a white gauze pullover and matching sarong skirt that looked like something the long, lithe model just tossed on in the casually chic way models often do.