satire

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satire

the use of ridicule, irony, sarcasm, etc., to expose folly or vice or to lampoon someone; burlesque, caricature, parody
Not to be confused with:
satyr – one of a class of Greek woodland gods with a goat’s or horse’s ears and tail and budding horns; a lustful or sensual man; lecher
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

sat·ire

 (săt′īr′)
n.
1.
a. A literary work in which human foolishness or vice is attacked through irony, derision, or wit.
b. The branch of literature constituting such works.
2. Irony, sarcasm, or caustic wit used to attack or expose human foolishness or vice.

[Latin satira, probably alteration (influenced by Greek satur, satyr, and saturos, burlesque of a mythical episode) of (lanx) satura, fruit (plate) mixture, from feminine of satur, sated, well-fitted; see sā- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

satire

(ˈsætaɪə)
n
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a novel, play, entertainment, etc, in which topical issues, folly, or evil are held up to scorn by means of ridicule and irony
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the genre constituted by such works
3. the use of ridicule, irony, etc, to create such an effect
[C16: from Latin satira a mixture, from satur sated, from satis enough]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

sat•ire

(ˈsæt aɪər)

n.
1. the use of irony, sarcasm, or ridicule in exposing, denouncing, or deriding vice, folly, etc.
2. a literary composition or genre in which human folly and vice are held up to scorn, derision, or ridicule.
[1500–10; < Latin satira, variant of satura medley, perhaps feminine derivative of satur sated (see saturate)]
syn: See irony1.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

satire

A genre using irony or ridicule to hold contentious issues, folly, or evil in scorn.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.satire - witty language used to convey insults or scornsatire - witty language used to convey insults or scorn; "he used sarcasm to upset his opponent"; "irony is wasted on the stupid"; "Satire is a sort of glass, wherein beholders do generally discover everybody's face but their own"--Jonathan Swift
humor, wit, witticism, wittiness, humour - a message whose ingenuity or verbal skill or incongruity has the power to evoke laughter
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

satire

noun
1. mockery, wit, irony, ridicule, sarcasm, raillery, pasquinade It's an easy target for satire.
2. parody, mockery, caricature, send-up (Brit. informal), spoof (informal), travesty, takeoff (informal), lampoon, skit, burlesque A sharp satire on the American political process.
Quotations
"It's hard not to write satire" [Juvenal Satires]
"Satire is a sort of glass, wherein beholders do generally discover everybody's face but their own" [Jonathan Swift The Battle of the Books]
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

satire

noun
A work, as a novel or play, that exposes folly by the use of humor or irony:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
نَقْد ساخِر، كِتابة ساخِرَه
satira
satire
szatíra
háîsádeila, satíra
satyrasatyrikassatyrinissatyriškai parodyti
satīra
satiră
satira
satir
сатира

satire

[ˈsætaɪəʳ] Nsátira f (on contra)
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

satire

[ˈsætaɪər] nsatire f
a satire on sth → une satire sur qch
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

satire

nSatire f (→ on auf +acc); the satire in his voicedie Ironie in seiner Stimme
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

satire

[ˈsætaɪəʳ] n satire (on)satira (di, su)
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

satire

(ˈsӕtaiə) noun
(a piece of) writing etc that makes someone look foolish. a satire on university life.
saˈtirical (-ˈti-) adjective
1. of satire. satirical writing.
2. mocking. in a satirical mood.
ˈsatirist (-ˈti-) noun
a person who writes or performs satire(s).
ˈsatirize, ˈsatirise (-ti-) verb
to make look foolish by using satire.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
Netanyahu joined scores of world leaders in Sunday's anti-terrorism rally in Paris following last week's deadly attack on French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo.
The mass rally, suggested and to be led by President Francois Hollande, is part of the reactions to the deadly shooting attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo on Wednesday morning; the attack and the subsequent police-gunmen clashes left 17 deaths and two dozens of others wounded.
Boysan also announced that a common edition by several satirical magazines in the country is on the way and preparations for such an edition has started, adding: "Unfortunately the satirical magazine world has suffered from a long period of non-communication.
NNA - Iranian President Hassan Rouhani has denounced "terrorism" and violence committed in the name of Islam, after the deadly attack on French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo in Paris.
Twelve persons including two police officers were killed, Wednesday, in a terrorist attack on the premises of satirical magazine "charlie Hebdo".
GLASGOW should be Scotland's capital, according to an article in a satirical magazine.
Wilde's advice on not being talked about popped into my head last week when I opened my fortnightly copy of the satirical magazine Private Eye.
Chaplin, pictured, plays Captain Fred Roberts who discovers a printing press in the ruins of Ypres in 1916 and decides to publish a satirical magazine called The Wipers Times.
TEHRAN (AFP) -- Around 400 people demonstrated in front of the French embassy in Tehran on Sunday to protest inflammatory depictions of Islam's Prophet Mohammed in an American-made film and in a French satirical magazine.
But the city can console itself with a victory and a runner-up spot in the annual Rotten Borough Awards in satirical magazine Private Eye.
Andrew Stephenson, senior partner at the firm, said Mr Carter-Ruck, who died at his home in Essex,had a ``kind of love-hate relationship'' with Private Eye, despite his repeated legal success against the satirical magazine.
The satirical magazine Private Eye was attacked yesterday as a mixture of "fact, fiction, fantasy and humour" at an appeal by a doctor struck off the medical register after the Bristol heart babies scandal.