boiling point

(redirected from Saturation temperature)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Encyclopedia.
Related to Saturation temperature: Saturation pressure

boiling point

n.
1. Abbr. BP
a. The temperature at which a liquid boils at a fixed pressure, especially under standard atmospheric conditions.
b. The temperature at which the vapor pressure of a liquid is equal to the ambient atmospheric pressure.
2. Informal
a. The point at which one loses one's temper.
b. The point of crisis; the turning point.

boiling point

n
1. (Chemistry) the temperature at which a liquid boils at a given pressure, usually atmospheric pressure at sea level; the temperature at which the vapour pressure of a liquid equals the external pressure
2. informal the condition of being angered or highly excited

boil′ing point`


n.
1. the temperature at which the vapor pressure of a liquid is equal to the pressure of the atmosphere on the liquid, equal to 212°F (100°C) for water at sea level. Abbr.: b.p.
2. the point beyond which one becomes visibly angry, outraged, or the like.
3. the point at which matters reach a crisis.
[1765–75]

boil·ing point

(boi′lĭng)
The temperature at which a liquid changes to a vapor or gas. As the temperature of a liquid rises, the pressure of escaping vapor also rises, and at the boiling point the pressure of the escaping vapor is equal to that exerted on the liquid by the surrounding air, causing bubbles to form. Typically boiling points are measured at sea level. At higher altitudes, where atmospheric pressure is lower, boiling points are lower. The boiling point of water at sea level is 212°F (100°C); that of mercury is 673.84°F (356.58°C).

boiling point

The temperature at which a liquid’s vapor pressure equals external pressure.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.boiling point - the temperature at which a liquid boils at sea level; "they brought the water to a boil"
temperature - the degree of hotness or coldness of a body or environment (corresponding to its molecular activity)
2.boiling point - being highly angry or excited; ready to boil over; "after an hour of waiting I was at the boiling point"
excitableness, excitability, volatility - being easily excited
Translations

boiling point

npunto di ebollizione

boil·ing point

n. punto de ebullición.
References in periodicals archive ?
The highest steam content was noticed at the point where the coolant temperature reached the saturation temperature primarily.
However, the high water content results in a high partial pressure of water, resulting in high values of saturation temperature.
This also means that at a given pressure, there are now two saturation temperatures to consider: saturated liquid temperature (also known as bubble point) and saturated vapor temperature (also known as dew point).
As shown, the melting temperature does not change obviously with the increase of saturation temperature (only one main endothermic melting peak is observed at around 168[degrees]C) while the melting peak shows a tendency to become narrow with increasing [T.
Comparisons of the saturation temperature determined from the measured pressure (using the properties provided by the refrigerant suppliers) and the directly measured temperature are shown for each refrigerant in Figure 6.
In this methodology boiling heat transfer is assumed to depend exponentially on superheat (which is defined as a difference between the wall temperature of the heater and the saturation temperature of the liquid):
In general mass flux, heat flux, inlet quality and saturation temperature and pressure are the major factors which affect evaporative heat transfer in all heat exchanger.
The reduction of the chamber growth rate is associated with the higher oil viscosity associated with the reduction of the saturation temperature and lowered oil mobility due to geomechanically reduced permeability that accompanies lowering of the chamber operating pressure.
The saturation temperature, or boiling point, of the liquid at atmospheric pressure was 56[degrees]C, which ensured that the maximum chip temperature could be maintained in the 70[degrees] to 90[degrees]C range, often used in the thermal design of electronics.
Dew will form if the air temperature around the object or at the soil surface drops below this saturation temperature and is above freezing.
Then, one has to look up the saturation temperature (or pressure) for the current pressure (or temperature) value.
The saturation temperature of steam is constantly maintained for even, consistent cooking.