Saturn


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Saturn
photographed by the Hubble Space Telescope in 1998

Sat·urn

 (săt′ərn)
n.
1. Roman Mythology The god of agriculture.
2. The sixth planet from the sun and the second largest in the solar system, having a sidereal period of revolution about the sun of 29.5 years at a mean distance of about 1.43 billion kilometers (891 million miles), a mean diameter of approximately 121,000 kilometers (75,000 miles), and a mass 96 times that of Earth.

[Middle English Saturnus, from Old English, from Latin Sāturnus, of Etruscan origin.]

Saturn

(ˈsætɜːn)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) the Roman god of agriculture and vegetation. Greek counterpart: Cronus

Saturn

(ˈsætɜːn)
n
1. (Astronomy) one of the giant planets, the sixth planet from the sun, around which revolve planar concentric rings (Saturn's rings) consisting of small frozen particles. The planet has 62 satellites. Mean distance from sun: 1425 million km; period of revolution around sun: 29.41 years; period of axial rotation: 10.23 hours; equatorial diameter and mass: 9.26 and 95.3 times that of the earth, respectively. See also Titan2
2. (Astronomy) a large US rocket used for launching various objects, such as a spaceprobe or an Apollo spacecraft, into space
3. (Alchemy) the alchemical name for lead2

Sat•urn

(ˈsæt ərn)

n.
1. a Roman god of agriculture, the consort of Ops, believed to have ruled the earth during an age of happiness and virtue: identified with the Greek god Cronus.
2. the planet sixth in order from the sun, having an equatorial diameter of 74,600 mi. (120,000 km), a mean distance from the sun of 886.7 million mi. (1427 million km), a period of revolution of 29.46 years, and 23 known moons. It is the second largest planet in the solar system, encompassed by a series of thin, flat rings composed of small particles of ice.
3. (in alchemy) the metal lead.

Sat·urn

(săt′ərn)
The sixth planet from the sun and the second largest, with a diameter about ten times that of Earth. Saturn is encircled by a large, flat system of rings that are made up mostly of tiny particles of ice. See Table at solar system. See Note at planet.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Saturn - a giant planet that is surrounded by three planar concentric rings of ice particlesSaturn - a giant planet that is surrounded by three planar concentric rings of ice particles; the 6th planet from the sun
solar system - the sun with the celestial bodies that revolve around it in its gravitational field
2.Saturn - (Roman mythology) god of agriculture and vegetation; counterpart of Greek Cronus; "Saturday is Saturn's Day"
Roman mythology - the mythology of the ancient Romans
Translations
Saturn
Saturnus
Saturn
Szaturnusz
土星
사투르누스토성
Saturnas
Saturn
SaturnSaturno
Saturn

Saturn

[ˈsætən] NSaturno m

Saturn

n (Astron, Myth) → Saturn m

Saturn

[ˈsætɜːn] n (Myth, Astron) → Saturno
References in classic literature ?
"Well, if they are coming-- No, Minnie, not Saturn." Saturn was a tennis-ball whose skin was partially unsewn.
"Saturn's all right for bumble-puppy," cried Freddy, joining them.
When the poem opens we see the old god Saturn already fallen--
His faded eyes, and saw his kingdom gone, And all the gloom and sorrow of the place, And that fair kneeling goddess; and then spake, As with a palsied tongue, and while his beard Shook horrid with such aspen-malady: 'O tender spouse of gold Hyperion, Thea, I feel thee ere I see thy face; Look up, and let me see our doom in it; Look up, and tell me if this feeble shape Is Saturn's; if thou hear'st the voice Of Saturn; tell me, if this wrinkled brow, Naked and bare of its great diadem, Peers like the front of Saturn.
Here Saturn's grey chaos rolls over me, and I obtain dim, shuddering glimpses into those Polar eternities; when wedged bastions of ice pressed hard upon what are now the Tropics; and in all the 25,000 miles of this world's circumference, not an inhabitable hand's breadth of land was visible.
Another phenomenon would now have passed before the observer's eye, and the molecules situated on the plane of the equator, escaping like a stone from a sling of which the cord had suddenly snapped, would have formed around the sun sundry concentric rings resembling that of Saturn. In their turn, again, these rings of cosmical matter, excited by a rotary motion about the central mass, would have been broken up and decomposed into secondary nebulosities, that is to say, into planets.
Uranus has eight, Saturn eight, Jupiter four, Neptune possibly three, and the Earth one.
Ofttimes in my father's house have I heard you glory in that you alone of the immortals saved the son of Saturn from ruin, when the others, with Juno, Neptune, and Pallas Minerva would have put him in bonds.
Thetis was not unmindful of the charge her son had laid upon her, so she rose from under the sea and went through great heaven with early morning to Olympus, where she found the mighty son of Saturn sitting all alone upon its topmost ridges.
(saith he) I had rather a great deal, men should say, there was no such man at all, as Plutarch, than that they should say, that there was one Plutarch, that would eat his children as soon as they were born; as the poets speak of Saturn. And as the contumely is greater towards God, so the danger is greater towards men.
Then Minerva said, "Father, son of Saturn, King of kings, it served Aegisthus right, and so it would any one else who does as he did; but Aegisthus is neither here nor there; it is for Ulysses that my heart bleeds, when I think of his sufferings in that lonely sea-girt island, far away, poor man, from all his friends.
And Minerva said, "Father, son of Saturn, King of kings, if, then, the gods now mean that Ulysses should get home, we should first send Mercury to the Ogygian island to tell Calypso that we have made up our minds and that he is to return.