Savannah


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Sa·van·nah

 (sə-văn′ə)
A city of southeast Georgia near the mouth of the Savannah River. Founded by James Oglethorpe in 1733, it is the oldest city in Georgia and has been a major port since the early 1800s.

Savannah

(səˈvænə)
n
1. (Placename) a port in the US, in E Georgia, near the mouth of the Savannah River: port of departure of the Savannah for Liverpool (1819), the first steamship to cross the Atlantic. Pop: 127 573 (2003 est)
2. (Placename) a river in the southeastern US, formed by the confluence of the Tugaloo and Seneca Rivers in NW South Carolina: flows southeast to the Atlantic. Length: 505 km (314 miles)

Sa•van•nah

(səˈvæn ə)

n.
1. a seaport in E Georgia, near the mouth of the Savannah River. 136,262.
2. a river flowing SE from E Georgia along most of the boundary between Georgia and South Carolina and into the Atlantic. 314 mi. (505 km) long.

savannah

An area of flat grassland in a tropical or subtropical region.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.savannah - a port in eastern Georgia near the mouth of the Savannah riverSavannah - a port in eastern Georgia near the mouth of the Savannah river
Empire State of the South, Georgia, Peach State, GA - a state in southeastern United States; one of the Confederate states during the American Civil War
2.savannah - a river in South Carolina that flows southeast to the AtlanticSavannah - a river in South Carolina that flows southeast to the Atlantic
Palmetto State, SC, South Carolina - a state in the Deep South; one of the original 13 colonies
3.savannah - a flat grassland in tropical or subtropical regionssavannah - a flat grassland in tropical or subtropical regions
grassland - land where grass or grasslike vegetation grows and is the dominant form of plant life
Translations

savannah

[səˈvænə] Nsabana f, pampa f (S. Cone), llanos mpl (Ven)

savannah

savanna [səˈvænə] nsavane f

savannah

savanna [səˈvænə] nsavana
References in classic literature ?
O." Then he sealed it and addressed it to "Captain James Calhoun, Barque 'Lone Star,' Savannah, Georgia."
I went down to the Albert Dock and found that she had been taken down the river by the early tide this morning, homeward bound to Savannah. I wired to Gravesend and learned that she had passed some time ago, and as the wind is easterly I have no doubt that she is now past the Goodwins and not very far from the Isle of Wight."
By the time that their sailing-ship reaches Savannah the mail-boat will have carried this letter, and the cable will have informed the police of Savannah that these three gentlemen are badly wanted here upon a charge of murder."
And yet it called to him across that leagues-wide savannah, and was like a benediction to his long-suffering, pain racked spirit.
In the first shade, where the savannah yielded to the dense mountain jungle, he had collapsed to die.
He gave it me at Savannah, when he lay a-dying, like as if I was to now, you see.
So he stood waist-deep in the grass and looked regretfully across the rolling savannah and the soft-swelling foothills to the Lion's Head, a massive peak of rock that upreared into the azure from the midmost centre of Guadalcanar, a landmark used for bearings by every coasting mariner, a mountain as yet untrod by the foot of a white man.
His grand-uncle Stephen had built the engines for the Savannah, the first American steamship to cross the Atlantic Ocean; and his cousin Alfred was the friend and co-worker of Morse, the inventor of the telegraph.
She had written verses which were admired in the South, wore a full-length portrait of the commodore on her bosom and spoke with the accent of Savannah. She had about her a positive strong odour of Washington.
On the banks of this brook I found many pleasant savannahs or meadows, plain, smooth, and covered with grass; and on the rising parts of them, next to the higher grounds, where the water, as might be supposed, never overflowed, I found a great deal of tobacco, green, and growing to a great and very strong stalk.
The next day, the sixteenth, I went up the same way again; and after going something further than I had gone the day before, I found the brook and the savannahs cease, and the country become more woody than before.
To begin with the Polyborus Brasiliensis: this is a common bird, and has a wide geographical range; it is most numerous on the grassy savannahs of La Plata (where it goes by the name of Carrancha), and is far from unfrequent throughout the sterile plains of Patagonia.