savings ratio

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savings ratio

n
(Economics) economics the ratio of personal savings to disposable income, esp using the difference between national figures for disposable income and consumer spending as a measure of savings
References in periodicals archive ?
Analysts now have a lofty 8.1% savings rate in June, after huge savings rate boosts that left an 8.0% (was 6.1%) May figure.
ISLAMABAD -- By the end of the incumbent governments' tenure, the finance ministry is targeting a minimal current account gap, which will need a 100% increase in the current savings rate.
With a net median income of $50,863, a 0.35 percent average savings account rate in top-ranked Sussex nets a savings rate return of 0.89 percent interest, or $777, over five years.
Katie Taylor, vice president of thought leadership at Fidelity, says her firm used to suggest a 10% savings rate, but, since delving deeper into the numbers, it recommends that people save 15%--including both employee savings and contributions from employers.
In a 2016 study, Fidelity noted that contributions have improved slightly (when taking into account both employee and employer contributions): Millennials (25-34), savings rate of 7.5 percent; Generation X (35-50), 8.2 percent; Baby Boomers (51-69), 9.7 percent.
M2 EQUITYBITES-September 7, 2018--HK lender raises savings rate
Summary: After a year of stagnation, domestic savings rose by 5.3% in 2017, but this reflected a slight decrease in the savings rate, which went down from one year to the
The remedy, according to the FCA is a basic savings rate on easy-access savings and another on cash ISAs once they have been open for a certain amount of time.
household savings rate at 2.8 percent, Greenlight kids are saving 8.4 percent of their money -- triple the national average.
Personal Savings Rate decreased from 3.6% during the fourth quarter of 2016 to 2.6% in the last quarter of 2017.
Consumers ended 2017 by accelerating spending faster than their incomes, squeezing their savings rate to its lowest levels since the eve of the Great Recession.
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