sawmill

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saw·mill

 (sô′mĭl′)
n.
1. A plant where timber is sawed into boards.
2. A large machine for sawing lumber.

sawmill

(ˈsɔːˌmɪl)
n
1. (Forestry) an industrial establishment where timber is sawn into planks, etc
2. (Forestry) a large sawing machine

saw•mill

(ˈsɔˌmɪl)

n.
a place or building in which timber is sawed into planks, boards, etc., by machinery.
[1545–55]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sawmill - a large sawing machinesawmill - a large sawing machine    
power saw, sawing machine, saw - a power tool for cutting wood
2.sawmill - a mill for dressing logs and lumber
factory, manufactory, manufacturing plant, mill - a plant consisting of one or more buildings with facilities for manufacturing
Translations
متَعَلِّق بالمَنْشَرَهمَنْشَرَه
na pilepila
savværksavværksarbejder
fûrészmalom
sögunarverksmiîjastarfsmaîur í sögunarverksmiîju
na píle
bıçkı atelyesikereste fabrikası

sawmill

[ˈsɔːmɪl] Naserradero m

sawmill

[ˈsɔːmɪl] nscierie f

sawmill

[ˈsɔːˌmɪl] nsegheria

saw2

(soː) noun
a tool for cutting, having a toothed edge. He used a saw to cut through the branch.
verbpast tense sawed: past participles sawn, ~sawed
to cut with a saw. He sawed the log in two.
ˈsawdust noun
a dust of tiny fragments of wood, made by sawing.
ˈsawmill noun
a place in which wood is mechanically sawn.
adjective
a sawmill worker.
References in classic literature ?
I had been told that Frome was poor, and that the saw-mill and the arid acres of his farm yielded scarcely enough to keep his household through the winter; but I had not supposed him to be in such want as Harmon's words implied, and I expressed my wonder.
I had often walked that way on Sundays, and knew that the solitary roof showing through bare branches near the bottom of the hill was that of Frome's saw-mill. It looked exanimate enough, with its idle wheel looming above the black stream dashed with yellow-white spume, and its cluster of sheds sagging under their white load.
Anson's earning twenty-five a day at carpentering, Liverpool getting twenty logging for the saw-mill, and Big Bill's getting forty a day as chief sawyer.
He had them in the greatest order--his tapes and his files, his receipts, and his letters with lawyers and correspondents; the documents relative to the wine project (which failed from a most unaccountable accident, after commencing with the most splendid prospects), the coal project (which only a want of capital prevented from becoming the most successful scheme ever put before the public), the patent saw-mills and sawdust consolidation project, &c., &c.
KEY WORDS: Bioaerosol; Organic Dust; Pulmonary Function Test; Saw-mill Workers