Saxe


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Saxe

(saks)
n
(Placename) the French name for Saxony

Saxe

(French saks)
n
(Biography) Hermann Maurice (ɛrman mɔris), comte de Saxe. 1696–1750, French marshal born in Saxony: he distinguished himself in the War of the Austrian Succession (1740–48)

sax•o•ny

(ˈsæk sə ni)

n.
1. a fine, three-ply woolen yarn.
2. a soft-finish, compact fabric for coats.
[1825–35; from Saxony]

Sax•o•ny

(ˈsæk sə ni)

n.
1. a state in E central Germany. 4,900,000; 6561 sq. mi. (16,990 sq. km). Cap.: Dresden.
2. a former state of the Weimar Republic in E central Germany. 5788 sq. mi. (14,990 sq. km). Cap.: Dresden.
3. a medieval division of N Germany with varying boundaries: extended at its height from the Rhine to E of the Elbe. German, Sachsen; French, Saxe.
Sax•o′ni•an (-ˈsoʊ ni ən) n., adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Saxe - a French marshal who distinguished himself in the War of the Austrian Succession (1696-1750)Saxe - a French marshal who distinguished himself in the War of the Austrian Succession (1696-1750)
2.Saxe - an area in Germany around the upper Elbe riverSaxe - an area in Germany around the upper Elbe river; the original home of the Saxons
References in classic literature ?
The Prince of Saxe Leinitzer twirled his heavy moustache and sank into a chair between the two women.
When she went into Kitty's little room, a pretty, pink little room, full of knick-knacks in vieux saxe, as fresh, and pink, and white, and gay as Kitty herself had been two months ago, Dolly remembered how they had decorated the room the year before together, with what love and gaiety.
This is a far cry from Saxe's view of NCSS as a "faction" claiming authority to "direct the educational programs of American public schools" NCSS does not claim such authority and does not, in fact, direct the polities of American public schools at all.
THE inventor of the saxophone was Adolphe Saxe, not Sax (Crossword, 15 across, August 14).
They issued arrest warrants for alleged gang leaders John Mason, 67, Ronald Everett, 68, and Clifford Saxe, 73, over the pounds 6million Security Express robbery in London in 1983.
Miller, Ruben Ortiz-Torres; Lam Pittman, Stephen Prina, Alison Saar, and Adrian Saxe. All the commissioned offerings unveiled in this exhibition organized by guest curator Lisa Lyons) take their inspiration from work already in the museum's collection--tying a permanent knot between scene and institution.
Saxe found that the statute defined a "non-occupying owner" as "the owner of a unit in a condominium who does not reside in the unit, when the unit is occupied by a non-purchasing tenant".
Saxe was a notable field commander, aggressive, enterprising, and fortunate; his strategy was subtle and effective, his tactics carefully chosen to suit each occasion; his reputation is due as much to his writings as to his generalship; in Mes reveries he emphasized the use of light infantry and artillery in a hypothetical all-arms organization that foreshadowed the Napoleonic corps; while some of Saxe's ideas were eccentric and impractical, they nevertheless show his commitment to military reform.
"There is not a political phone in the state that isn't busy right now," veteran Democratic State Committee member Diane Saxe said Friday on the immediate effect of the unexpected announcement.
The reason was Saxe Coburg's resignation from the party leadership after the NMSP's devastating defeat at the July 2009 national parliamentary elections, which left the party with no MPs after two consecutive eight-year terms served in the executive branch of power
Carrollwood Bar Elects Officers: The Carrollwood Community Bar Association recently elected its 2006 officers and directors, including Paul Riffel, president, James Loper, vice president, William Coffman, secretary, Robert Wise, treasurer, and directors Daniel Bubley, Martin Bubley, Paul Elliott, Andrew Hayes, Joseph Kalish, Randall Reder, Daniel Saxe, Claire Saady, and Brian Weakland.