Saxon


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Related to Saxon: Saxon people

Sax·on

 (săk′sən)
n.
1. A member of a West Germanic tribal group that inhabited northern Germany and invaded Britain in the fifth and sixth centuries ad with the Angles and Jutes.
2. A person of English or Lowland Scots birth or ancestry as distinguished from one of Irish, Welsh, or Highland Scots birth or ancestry.
3. A native or inhabitant of Saxony.
4. The West Germanic language of any of the ancient Saxon peoples.
5. The Germanic element of English as distinguished from the French and Latin elements.

[Middle English, from Late Latin Saxō, Saxon-, of Germanic origin; see sek- in Indo-European roots.]

Sax′on adj.

Saxon

(ˈsæksən)
n
1. (Peoples) a member of a West Germanic people who in Roman times spread from Schleswig across NW Germany to the Rhine. Saxons raided and settled parts of S Britain in the fifth and sixth centuries ad. In Germany they established a duchy and other dominions, which changed and shifted through the centuries, usually retaining the name Saxony
2. (Historical Terms) a member of a West Germanic people who in Roman times spread from Schleswig across NW Germany to the Rhine. Saxons raided and settled parts of S Britain in the fifth and sixth centuries ad. In Germany they established a duchy and other dominions, which changed and shifted through the centuries, usually retaining the name Saxony
3. (Peoples) a native or inhabitant of Saxony
4. (Languages)
a. the Low German dialect of Saxony
b. any of the West Germanic dialects spoken by the ancient Saxons or their descendants
adj
5. (Peoples) of, relating to, or characteristic of the ancient Saxons, the Anglo-Saxons, or their descendants
6. (Placename) of, relating to, or characteristic of Saxony, its inhabitants, or their Low German dialect
7. (Peoples) of, relating to, or characteristic of Saxony, its inhabitants, or their Low German dialect
8. (Languages) of, relating to, or characteristic of Saxony, its inhabitants, or their Low German dialect
9. (Historical Terms) of, relating to, or characteristic of Saxony, its inhabitants, or their Low German dialect
[C13 (replacing Old English Seaxe): via Old French from Late Latin Saxon-, Saxo, from Greek; of Germanic origin and perhaps related to the name of a knife used by the Saxons; compare saw1]

Sax•on

(ˈsæk sən)

n.
1. a member of a Germanic people or confederation of peoples, occupying parts of the North Sea littoral and adjacent hinterlands in the 3rd–4th centuries a.d.: later notorious as sea raiders, groups of whom invaded and settled in S Britain in the 5th–6th centuries.
2. a native or inhabitant of Saxony.
3. a native of England, or person of English descent, esp. as opposed to an inhabitant of the British Isles of Celtic descent.
adj.
4. of or pertaining to the early Saxons.
5. of or pertaining to Saxony or its inhabitants.
[1250–1300; Middle English, probably < Late Latin Saxō, Saxonēs (pl.) < Germanic; replacing Old English Seaxan (pl.)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Saxon - a member of a Germanic people who conquered England and merged with the Angles and Jutes to become Anglo-SaxonsSaxon - a member of a Germanic people who conquered England and merged with the Angles and Jutes to become Anglo-Saxons; dominant in England until the Norman Conquest
European - a native or inhabitant of Europe
West Saxon - an inhabitant of Wessex
Adj.1.Saxon - of or relating to or characteristic of the early Saxons or Anglo-Saxons and their descendents (especially the English or Lowland Scots) and their language; "Saxon princes"; "for greater clarity choose a plain Saxon term instead of a latinate one"
England - a division of the United Kingdom
Translations
saksi
サクソン人サクソン族のサクソン語サクソン語の

Saxon

[ˈsæksn]
A. ADJsajón
B. N
1. (= person) → sajón/ona m/f
2. (Ling) → sajón m

Saxon

n
Sachse m, → Sächsin f; (Hist) → (Angel)sachse m/-sächsin f
(Ling) → Sächsisch nt
adjsächsisch; (Hist) → (angel)sächsisch

Saxon

[ˈsæksən] adj & nsassone m/f
References in classic literature ?
Most of the entries in the 'Chronicle' are bare and brief, but sometimes, especially in the accounts of Alfred's own splendid exploits, a writer is roused to spirited narrative, occasionally in verse; and in the tenth century two great battles against invading Northmen, at Brunanburh and Maldon, produced the only important extant pieces of Anglo-Saxon poetry which certainly belong to the West Saxon period.
They themselves occupied the land chiefly as masters of scattered farms, each warrior established in a large rude house surrounded by its various outbuildings and the huts of the British slaves and the Saxon and British bondmen.
The Angles, Saxons, and Jutes occupied territories in the region which includes parts of the present Holland, of Germany about the mouth of the Elbe, and of Denmark.
the Angles, Saxons, and Jutes began to harry the southern and eastern shores of Britain, where the Romans were obliged to maintain a special military establishment against them.
Guests also were invited in great numbers; and in the necessity in which he then found himself of courting popularity, Prince John had extended his invitation to a few distinguished Saxon and Danish families, as well as to the Norman nobility and gentry of the neighbourhood.
Cedric and Athelstane were both dressed in the ancient Saxon garb, which, although not unhandsome in itself, and in the present instance composed of costly materials, was so remote in shape and appearance from that of the other guests, that Prince John took great credit to himself with Waldemar Fitzurse for refraining from laughter at a sight which the fashion of the day rendered ridiculous.
``By St Anthony!'' answered the black-brow'd giant, ``I will consent that your highness shall hold me a Saxon, if either Cedric or Wilfred, or the best that ever bore English blood, shall wrench from me the gift with which your highness has graced me.''
``Whoever shall call thee Saxon, Sir Baron,'' replied Cedric, offended at a mode of expression by which the Normans frequently expressed their habitual contempt of the English, ``will do thee an honour as great as it is undeserved.''
Saxon, clinging to an imaginary partner, essayed a few steps of the dip-waltz.
Saxon smiled with appreciation, pointed out her foot, velvet-slippered with high Cuban heels, and slightly lifted the tight black skirt, exposing a trim ankle and delicate swell of calf, the white flesh gleaming through the thinnest and flimsiest of fifty-cent black silk stockings.
"You watch out for him, Saxon, if he ever comes foolin' around you.
"He IS, just the same, from what all people say of him," Saxon went on stoutly.