Saxonism

Sax·on·ism

 (săk′sə-nĭz′əm)
n.
An English word, phrase, or idiom of Anglo-Saxon origin.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Saxonism

a word, idiom, phrase, etc., of Anglo-Saxon or supposed Anglo-Saxon origin.
See also: Language
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
Much the same is it with many other sinewy Saxonisms of this sort, which emigrated to New-England rocks with the noble brawn of the old English emigrants in the time of the Commonwealth.
Unfortunately for posterity he too enthusiastically described the changes then occurring in Germany, defending them as expressions of an essential Saxonism also seen in the Reformation.
steadily altered the discourse on the primacy of Anglo Saxonism. For approximately thirty years, from 1880 through 1910, unprecedented European immigration demographically transformed the U.S.
To explicate the cultural aspects of unstable English national identity, Young's book, from the very beginning, examines different race theories and the contesting ideas of race in English cultural history and science, where the term "race"--more particularly 'Saxonism' or 'the Anglo-Saxon'--is used interchangeably with the concepts of both nation and ethnicity.
Thus, for example, because some authors explicitly attach Saxonism to claims about native and natural liberty or to the "pure Church," Doyle then presumes that any subsequent invocation of "native" or "pure" is inherently an invocation of Saxonism.
Even so, Anglo Saxonism still welcomed the immigrant because it was believed that Americans had the remarkable ability to assimilate peoples from a wide range of racial origins.
(1995), Race and Manifest Destiny: The Origins of American Racial Anglo- Saxonism, Cambridge, MA.
Monger, The End of Isolation: British Foreign Policy 1900-1907 (1963); Stuart Anderson, Race and Rapprochement: Anglo Saxonism and Anglo-American Relations, 1895-1904 (1981); Phillip E.
For a discussion of the academic politics of Normanism and Saxonism, see CANTOR, supra note 3, at 268-86.
Education and other scholars from the US consider the myth that Jefferson was more a man of science than morality; criticism that his adoption of Saxon constitutionalism was an adoption of false history, examining the roots of his Saxonism and their effects on his republicanism; the use of his views by the Supreme Court; the myth of his conception of liberty; the myth of his racism; the label of Jefferson as a deist, showing that he was instead a theist; the influence of his educational views on James Bryant Conant; his views on citizenship education, and connections to John Dewey; his views on guns; his architectural achievements; and the depiction of Jefferson in the mind of the general public.