scambler


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scambler

(ˈskæmblə)
n
1. Scot an unwelcome visitor who takes advantage of the hospitality of others, esp during mealtimes; sponger; opportunist
2. a person who stumbles or moves unsteadily or awkwardly
References in periodicals archive ?
2007; Scambler, Hepburn, Rutherford, Wehner, & Rogers, 2007; Schietecatte, Roeyers, & Warreyn, 2012; Sullivan et al.
Scambler, Bond, and Bowling (2005) as being the 'deprivation of social contact, the lack of people available or willing to share social and emotional experiences, a state where an individual has the potential to interact with others but is not doing so and a discrepancy between the actual and desired interaction with others.
GETTING ready for a combined assault on the tiddlers in Sefton Park lake, right, are Gary Scambler, aged five, his brother, Kevin, aged six, and their friend Angela, also aged six.
We are all really happy that we can do something for the family and staff will lead the horses which will walk, so it won't be too much for him," ranch owner Caroline Scambler said.
1 Newton T, Asimakopoulou K, Daly B, Scambler S and Scott S.
Farrell MJ, Stadt H, Wallis KT, Scambler P, Hixon RL, Wolfe R, et al.
Popular resistance to the Coalition government's legislative proposals was organised in a networked and horizontal fashion typical of protest movements in the digital era (Castells, 2012; Mason, 2012; Scambler et al, 2014).
Scambler P, Kelly D, Lindsay E, Williamson R, Goldberg R, Shprintzen R, et al.
Stigma is a context-specific social construct and Scambler (2006, 293) remarks that in the post welfare state, stigma is often justified by the idea of personal responsibility.
Hobbycraft Edinburgh manager, Nathan Scambler, said: "It's great that we can encourage local pupils to get making while also having fun with the bonnet competition.