Scheherezade


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Sche·her·e·zade

 (shə-hĕr′ə-zäd′)
n.
A skilled woman storyteller.

[After the fictional queen Scheherezade, , skilled narrator of the tales in the anonymous The Arabian Nights' Entertainment.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
None less so than in his symphonic suite Scheherezade based on exotic Arabian Nights.
La cita, que convoca a los fantasmas de Emma Bovary y de Scheherezade, (12) establece una analogia transparente entre la revolucion y la literatura, pero ademas senala una identidad entre las actitudes de los sujetos que encaran dos empresas que resultan comparables porque enlazan el archivo (la novela) y el repertorio (la revolucion), y se inscriben en la orbita mas general de la autoria tal como la venimos definiendo aqui.
found in a bottle; The unparalleled adventure of one Hans Pfaall; The conversation of Eiros and Charmion; A descent into the maelstrom; The colloquy of Monos and Una; A tale of the Ragged Mountains; The balloon-hoax; Mesmeric revelation; The thousand-and-second tale of Scheherezade; Some words with a mummy; The power of words; The system of Dr Tarr and Prof.
The suggestion was not far-fetched: The storyboard sequencing of images in The Thousand and One Nights, 1950, Matisse's recasting of the Scheherezade tale, recalls Lotte Reiniger's classic full-length animation of the same story, The Adventures of Prince Achmed (1926), itself created using paper silhouettes.
No obstante, la inclusion de la referencia a Las mil y una noches evoca, en el solo nombre de la obra, la idea de una extension prolongada de tiempo cifrada en la dilacion de los relatos sucesivos que Scheherezade hara al Sultan:
Scheherezade, I'll string tales of heroines, pearls lost
Second row: Nathalie Villard, Hannah Allam, Monica Almeida, Chris Vognar, Haili Cao, Andrea Simakis, Kael Alford, Scheherezade Faramarzi, Peter Wolodarski, Carla Broyles, Ching-Ching Ni, Margie Mason, Guy Raz, Andrei Zolotov Jr., Rosita Boland, Tommy Tomlinson.
All of the works presented in Madrid broke with classical ballet, and certain ones, most notably Scheherezade and Prince Igor (also called Polovtsian Dances) demonstrated violent Dionysian aspects, an avant-garde "barbarism" that was at the time taking on a high degree of symbolic capital in the cultural fields of European capital cities until then accustomed to consuming a more classical dance culture.
We think of Scheherezade Alam as an undoubtedly seminal figure in ceramic innovation, aesthetics and production.
In the epic Persian tale 1,001 Nights, Scheherezade harnesses the power of storytelling to transform a vengeful king.