Schlieffen


Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Schlieffen: Alfred von Schlieffen

Schlieffen

(German ˈʃliːfən)
n
(Biography) Alfred (ˈalfreːt), Count von Schlieffen. 1833–1913, German field marshal, who devised the Schlieffen Plan (1905): it was intended to ensure German victory over a Franco-Russian alliance by holding off Russia with minimal strength and swiftly defeating France by a massive flanking movement through the Low Countries. In a modified form, it was unsuccessfully employed in World War I (1914)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
The German Failure in Belgium, August 1914: How Faulty Reconnaissance Exposed the Weakness of the Schlieffen Plan
Given the importance of the historiographical debate on Schlieffen and the younger Moltke, they provide extensive coverage of the tenures of these two men at the helm of the General Staff.
At the close of the nineteenth century, wargames became a global phenomenon as the Russians, Japanese, French, British, and Americans assimilated this practice into military planning.3 In 1905, German chief of the Great General Staff Alfred von Schlieffen conducted a broad-ranging wargame that tested his plan for a decisive attack of France by way of Belgium.
If the origins for the Schlieffen Plan can be traced as far back as
In 1914, the Germans had the Schlieffen Plan and the French had Plan XVII.
that as he prepared his Army to execute the Schlieffen Plan in a war
He now almost makes out that GRGRGR is a reincarnation of Bismarck with a Schlieffen plan for a lightning strike on a not so innocent neighbor.
With a clear understanding of those differences, the reader may now understand how the French lost their best opportunity not only to stymie the Schlieffen Plan, but to change the course of the rest of the war.
The Schlieffen Plan was devised in Germany in the last decade of the 19th century by the Chief of the Great General Staff, Field Marshal Alfred von Schlieffen.
alfred von Schlieffen was in charge of the entire German army.
From Great Elector Frederick William's (successful) mad 160-mile march to defeat the Swedes at Fehrbellin (1675) to Helmuth von Moltke the Elder's (successful) deployment of his armies in the Austro-Prussian War of 1866, and from the (failed) Schlieffen Plan of 1914 to the (failed) Operation Barbarossa of 1941, the premise remained that Germany must wage its campaigns and wars quickly or not at all.
Germany's Schlieffen Plan, for example, assumed a rapid and decisive victory in the western theater of operations against France while, on Germany's eastern flank, Russian mobilization would lag behind the pace necessary for a prompt offensive against Germany.