Schmidt telescope

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Schmidt telescope

or

Schmidt camera

n
(Astronomy) a catadioptric telescope designed to produce a very sharp image of a large area of sky in one photographic exposure. It incorporates a thin specially shaped glass plate at the centre of curvature of a short-focus spherical primary mirror so that the resulting image, which is focused on a photographic plate, is free from spherical aberration, coma, and astigmatism
[C20: named after B. V. Schmidt (1879–1935), Estonian-born German inventor]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Schmidt telescope - reflecting telescope that has plate that corrects for aberration so a wide area of sky can be photographed
reflecting telescope, reflector - optical telescope consisting of a large concave mirror that produces an image that is magnified by the eyepiece; "Isaac Newton invented the reflecting telescope in 1668"
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References in periodicals archive ?
Full-aperture objective prisms on Schmidt cameras have proven a powerful survey tool, as in searches for quasars and the automated spectral typing of stars.
In common with SCTs, Schmidt cameras brought light to a focus using a catadioptric combination of a refracting corrector plate followed by a spherical short-focal-length primary mirror.
To date, about 20 Schmidt cameras have been completed, two thirds of them in the United States.
The Rowe-Ackermann Schmidt Astrograph is a modern reworking of the classic 5.5- and 8-inch Schmidt cameras Celestron produced in the 1970s and '80s.
www.celestron.com Celestron unveiled the Rowe-Ackermann f/2.2 Schmidt Astrograph, which is a 21st-century optical update of Celestron's Schmidt cameras from the film era.
By the close of the '70s, Celestron's product line boasted Schmidt- and Maksutov-Cassegrain telescopes, spotting scopes, telephoto lenses, Schmidt cameras, binoculars, and scores of accessories.
Apart from the topic of camera lenses, about the only time anyone mentions "f/2" and "astrophotography" in the same sentence is when they're talking about Schmidt cameras. And that turns out to be a pretty good analogy for HyperStar.