Schmidt telescope


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Related to Schmidt telescope: Schmidt camera

Schmidt telescope

or

Schmidt camera

n
(Astronomy) a catadioptric telescope designed to produce a very sharp image of a large area of sky in one photographic exposure. It incorporates a thin specially shaped glass plate at the centre of curvature of a short-focus spherical primary mirror so that the resulting image, which is focused on a photographic plate, is free from spherical aberration, coma, and astigmatism
[C20: named after B. V. Schmidt (1879–1935), Estonian-born German inventor]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Schmidt telescope - reflecting telescope that has plate that corrects for aberration so a wide area of sky can be photographed
reflecting telescope, reflector - optical telescope consisting of a large concave mirror that produces an image that is magnified by the eyepiece; "Isaac Newton invented the reflecting telescope in 1668"
References in periodicals archive ?
The typical discovery story you'll read for galactic cirrus goes something like this: It was first noticed on glass plates taken with the 48-inch Schmidt telescope at Palomar Observatory, one of the most productive telescopes of the modern age.
Contract Awarded for crane remote controller for united kingdom schmidt telescope
2m Oschin Schmidt telescope at Palomar in the course of the NEAT programme.
Beutler's work draws on data from a survey of more than 125,000 galaxies carried out with the UK Schmidt Telescope in eastern Australia.
An instrument outfitted with such a mirror and corrector plate is called a Schmidt telescope, or, since it is invariably used with a photographic plate rather than an eye receiving the light, a Schmidt camera.
5-m Uppsala Southern Schmidt Telescope where Robert was working, and we became the second, third, and fourth people in the world to see what would subsequently be called Comet C/2011 N2 (McNaught).
9 Schmidt telescope on Mount Bigelow, Arizona, 2012 XE54, a near-Earth asteroid (NEA) some 15-40 metres in size, was promptly predicted by Pasquale Tricarico of the Planetary Science Institute, Tucson, to undergo a partial eclipse by the Earth's shadow--observation of which would be a unique event.
5-meter Uppsala Schmidt telescope and a CCD camera.