Schmidt telescope

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Schmidt telescope

or

Schmidt camera

n
(Astronomy) a catadioptric telescope designed to produce a very sharp image of a large area of sky in one photographic exposure. It incorporates a thin specially shaped glass plate at the centre of curvature of a short-focus spherical primary mirror so that the resulting image, which is focused on a photographic plate, is free from spherical aberration, coma, and astigmatism
[C20: named after B. V. Schmidt (1879–1935), Estonian-born German inventor]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Schmidt telescope - reflecting telescope that has plate that corrects for aberration so a wide area of sky can be photographed
reflecting telescope, reflector - optical telescope consisting of a large concave mirror that produces an image that is magnified by the eyepiece; "Isaac Newton invented the reflecting telescope in 1668"
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References in periodicals archive ?
Secondly using complex, high-quality, professionally-managed Schmidt telescopes, widely known as "Baker-Nunn" cameras, (2) (see also MNASSA Vol 71 Nos 5 & 6 June 2012).
His letter repeated the proposals of the Committee on Post-War Needs in Astronomy for a large reflector, preferably of 100 inches' aperture, to be built at Herstmonceux, and two Schmidt telescopes, one of them to be in the southern hemisphere.
Billed as aplanatic Schmidt telescopes, the EdgeHD series represents the first major redesign of the Schmidt-Cassegrain optical system that Celestron introduced in the 1960s.
Billed as aplanatic Schmidt telescopes, this series of 8-, 9Y4-, 11-, and 14-inch tube assemblies incorporates a 2-element field flattener and coma corrector in the main light-baffle tube that promises to correct distortions to the edge of the largest CCD detectors on the market.
After the Shoemakers and I ended our program at Palomar in 1996, Carolyn, Wendee, and I continued the search using film and a pair of 8-inch Celestron Schmidt telescopes. Our project gradually evolved into a CCD comet search, this time using a highly modified SBIG CCD camera coupled to a 12-inch Meade Schmidt telescope.