schoolman

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school·man

 (sko͞ol′mən)
n.
1. A man who is a professional educator or scholar.
2. Schoolman A medieval Scholastic scholar or philosopher.

schoolman

(ˈskuːlmən)
n, pl -men
1. (sometimes capital) a scholar versed in the learning of the Schoolmen
2. (Education) rare chiefly US a professional educator or teacher

Schoolman

(ˈskuːlmən)
n, pl -men
(Historical Terms) (sometimes not capital) a master in one of the schools or universities of the Middle Ages who was versed in scholasticism; scholastic

school•man

(ˈskul mən, -ˌmæn)

n., pl. -men (-mən, -ˌmɛn)
1. a person versed or engaged in scholastic learning or pursuits.
2. (sometimes cap.) a medieval teacher of theology or philosophy.
[1530–40]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.schoolman - a scholar in one of the universities of the Middle AgesSchoolman - a scholar in one of the universities of the Middle Ages; versed in scholasticism
bookman, scholar, scholarly person, student - a learned person (especially in the humanities); someone who by long study has gained mastery in one or more disciplines
2.schoolman - a scholar who is skilled in academic disputationschoolman - a scholar who is skilled in academic disputation
bookman, scholar, scholarly person, student - a learned person (especially in the humanities); someone who by long study has gained mastery in one or more disciplines
Translations

schoolman

[ˈskuːlmən] N (schoolmen (pl)) (Philos) → escolástico m
References in classic literature ?
It was gravely said by some of the prelates in the Council of Trent, where the doctrine of the Schoolmen bare great sway, that the Schoolmen were like astronomers, which did feign eccentrics and epicycles, and such engines of orbs, to save the phenomena; though they knew there were no such things; and in like manner, that the Schoolmen had framed a number of subtle and intricate axioms, and theorems, to save the practice of the church.
I have read Ockham, Bradwardine, and other of the schoolmen, together with the learned Duns Scotus and the book of the holy Aquinas.
The things that had filled his days seemed now like a nursery parody of life, or like the wrangles of mediaeval schoolmen over metaphysical terms that nobody had ever understood.
It is due also to the misunderstanding of him by the Aristotelian school; and the erroneous notion has been further narrowed and has become fixed by the realism of the schoolmen.
But it is very easy to outrun the sympathy of readers on this topic, which schoolmen called natura naturata, or nature passive.
The importance of this period is due in large part to the immense effort of medieval schoolmen to better understand the sacrament of holy orders.
Wootton presents extensive evidence, much of it linguistic, that something genuinely new was going on in the 16th and 17th centuries, something essentially different from the attempts of the ancient Greeks or medieval schoolmen at understanding the physical world.
Among other things, the schoolmen turned their attention to religious rituals, especially to sacraments.
At this historical juncture, I simply do not think literary studies can afford to advertise as focal our familiar models of inwardly focused competitive debate--unless we are content to be cast as the Aristotelian schoolmen of the twenty-first century, dancing on the head of a pin rather than (as feminists used to say) dancing through the minefields.
Then Hayek continues: "The medieval conception of social order was, however, still largely one of the particular status of different individuals or classes and only some of the late Spanish schoolmen approached the conception of an abstract order based on a uniform law for all.
Simply as a point of fact, apart from the martyrs, the monks, the crusaders, the schoolmen, the missionaries, and apart from the Mass, there would have been no such thing as "the West.