Scipio

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Scipio

(ˈskɪpɪˌəʊ; ˈsɪpɪˌəʊ)
n
1. (Biography) full name Publius Cornelius Scipio Africanus Major. 237–183 bc, Roman general. He commanded the Roman invasion of Carthage in the Second Punic War, defeating Hannibal at Zama (202)
2. (Biography) full name Publius Cornelius Scipio Aemilianus Africanus Minor. ?185–129 bc, Roman statesman and general; the grandson by adoption of Scipio Africanus Major. He commanded an army against Carthage in the last Punic War and razed the city to the ground (146). He became the leader (132) of the opposition in Rome to popular reforms
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Scip•i•o

(ˈsɪp iˌoʊ, ˈskɪp-)

n.
1. (Publius Cornelius Scipio Africanus Major) ( “Scipio the Elder” ), 237–183 B.C., Roman general who defeated Hannibal.
2. his adopted grandson, (Publius Cornelius Scipio Aemilianus Africanus Numantinus Minor) ( “Scipio the Younger” ), c185–129 B.C., Roman general: besieger and destroyer of Carthage.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Scipio - Roman general who commanded the invasion of Carthage in the second Punic War and defeated Hannibal at Zama (circa 237-183 BC)Scipio - Roman general who commanded the invasion of Carthage in the second Punic War and defeated Hannibal at Zama (circa 237-183 BC)
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Translations

Scipio

[ˈskɪpɪəʊ] NEscipión
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Toward the end of the nineteenth century, Pasquale Villari contended that the militia ordinance had been envisioned on the model of the Swiss and the Roman military systems, and that Machiavelli and Piero Soderini, its two chief promoters, had been motivated by their "noble patriotism" and their admiration for ancient Roman exemplars such as Manlius Torquatus, the Scipii and the Camillii.