brank

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Related to Scold's bridle: Scavenger's daughter

brank

 (brăngk) or branks (brăngks)
n.
A device consisting of a metal frame for the head and a bit to restrain the tongue, formerly used to punish scolds.

[Possibly from Dutch branken, legs (of a compass, scissors, etc.), pl. of branke, branch, from Late Latin branca, paw; see branch.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

brank

(bræŋk)
vb (intr)
dialect Scot (esp of horses) to prance or strut
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
There is an iron "scold's bridle" in Walton Church.
ALEGENDARY cup, a trove of Celtic treasures, a scold's bridle, a Laura Ashley dress and SuperTed are among 100 diverse objects collected together for a fascinating new book, Wales in 100 Objects and its Welsh counterpart Cymru Mewn 100 Gwrthrych.
The mayor, at the end of his tether over the constant heckling, called for the scold's bridle.
By the late 19th century, the Stafford Scold's Bridle was considered more of an historic curiosity than a form of punishment.
Until the eighteenth century, those who fought back might be condemned to the "scold's bridle," a metal and leather contraption, also used to muzzle slaves, that enclosed the wearer's head and, if she attempted to speak, lacerated her tongue.
Display of Morpeth's treasures, including the silver mace from 1604 - the oldest working civic mace in the country, cannon balls from the 1644 siege of Morpeth Castle and a scold's bridle for gossips or scolding wives.
The scold's bridle (or brank's bridle, or branks) is an artifact we now see on display in museums, but from the sixteenth to the nineteenth centuries in Europe (England, Wales, Germany, and Scotland) it was used to punish women who had a lashing, scathing tongue, to punish chatterboxes, gossips, busybodies, yentas, yakety yaks, nags, harpies, shrews, vixens, quibblers, spitfires, hags, magpies, blabbermouths, loudmouths, prattlers, tattletales, hawkers, fussbudgets, floozies ...
The gruesome scold's bridle is one of the forms of punishment on display at a new exhibition which opens today.
Williams outlines things like 'the controversy over woman', scolds and the scold's bridle, aspects of witchcraft trials, folklore and superstition, anti-Catholic sentiment, and the trope of the grotesque.
However, the monster, whose design incorporates a face plate based on a medieval torture device called a scold's bridle, will be portrayed by a star of more than 100 movies.
can we reintroduce the "scold's bridle" for morons?
It was called the 'Scold's Bridle' and was used as a punishment for nagging women..