scorpion

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scor·pi·on

 (skôr′pē-ən)
n.
1. Any of various arachnids of the order Scorpiones, chiefly of warm dry regions, having large claws and a segmented tail that curves over the back and is tipped with a venomous sting.
2. Scorpion See Scorpius.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin scorpiō, scorpiōn-, alteration of scorpius, from Greek skorpios.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

scorpion

(ˈskɔːpɪən)
n
1. (Animals) any arachnid of the order Scorpionida, of warm dry regions, having a segmented body with a long tail terminating in a venomous sting
2. (Animals) false scorpion any small nonvenomous arachnid of the order Pseudoscorpionida (or Chelonethida), which superficially resemble scorpions but lack the long tail. See book scorpion
3. (Animals) any of various other similar arachnids, such as the whip scorpion, or other arthropods, such as the water scorpion
4. (Bible) Old Testament a barbed scourge (I Kings 12:11)
5. (Historical Terms) history a war engine for hurling stones; ballista
[C13: via Old French from Latin scorpiō, from Greek skorpios, of obscure origin]

Scorpion

(ˈskɔːpɪən)
n
(Astronomy) the Scorpion the constellation Scorpio, the eighth sign of the zodiac
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

scor•pi•on

(ˈskɔr pi ən)

n.
1. any arachnid of the order Scorpiones, common in warm climates, having a front pair of pincers and a long, upcurved tail that ends in a venomous stinger.
2. the Scorpion, Scorpius.
3. Bible. a whip or scourge. I Kings 12:11.
[1175–1225; Middle English < Latin scorpiō, s. scorpiōn-=scorp(ius) scorpion (< Greek skorpíos) + -iō n. suffix, perhaps after pāpiliō butterfly, or stelliō gecko]
scor`pi•on′ic (-ˈɒn ɪk) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.scorpion - (astrology) a person who is born while the sun is in ScorpioScorpion - (astrology) a person who is born while the sun is in Scorpio
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
astrology, star divination - a pseudoscience claiming divination by the positions of the planets and sun and moon
2.Scorpion - the eighth sign of the zodiac; the sun is in this sign from about October 23 to November 21
3.scorpion - arachnid of warm dry regions having a long segmented tail ending in a venomous stinger
arachnid, arachnoid - air-breathing arthropods characterized by simple eyes and four pairs of legs
order Scorpionida, Scorpionida - true scorpions
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
štír
skorpion
عقرب
skorpioni
škorpion
skorpió
kalajengking
sporðdrekisporîdreki
サソリ
전갈
skorpionas
skorpions
scorpion
škorpión
škorpijon
skorpion
แมงป่อง
con bọ cạp

scorpion

[ˈskɔːpɪən] Nalacrán m, escorpión m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

scorpion

[ˈskɔːrpiən] nscorpion m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

scorpion

nSkorpion m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

scorpion

[ˈskɔːpɪən] nscorpione m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

scorpion

(ˈskoːpiən) noun
an animal of the same class as spiders that has a tail with a sting.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

scorpion

عَقْرَب štír skorpion Skorpion σκορπιός escorpión skorpioni scorpion škorpion scorpione サソリ 전갈 schorpioen skorpion skorpion escorpião скорпион skorpion แมงป่อง akrep con bọ cạp 蝎子
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009

scor·pi·on

n., Gr. escorpión, alacrán;
___ stingpicadura de ___.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

scorpion

n alacrán m (esp. Amer), escorpión m
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
"I'll transform you all into scorpions!" cried the King, angrily, and began waving his arms and muttering magic words.
In the interesting land of India, where snakes abound and scorpions are common objects of the wayside, a native who has had the misfortune to be bitten by one of the latter pursues an admirably common-sense plan.
He had caught a goodly number, when he saw a Scorpion, and mistaking him for a locust, reached out his hand to take him.
It seems that he threatened to kill every beast there was on earth; whereupon, in her anger, Earth sent up against him a scorpion of very great size by which he was stung and so perished.
It's the Scorpion' they're giving me, Gerald--or the mystery ship, as they call it in the navy."
He whom the flame of jealousy encompasseth, turneth at last, like the scorpion, the poisoned sting against himself.
That passion which had formerly been so exquisitely delicious, became now a scorpion in her bosom.
These pieces vanished no one knew where, and only the lion's head remained, which was at once changed into a scorpion. Quick as thought the princess assumed the form of a serpent and gave battle to the scorpion, who, finding he was getting the worst of it, turned himself into an eagle and took flight.
I found one cannibal scorpion quietly devouring another.
As he used to say, he "liked to account to himself" for practically everything that came in his way, down to a miserable scorpion he had found in his cabin a week before.
And now thir way to Earth they had descri'd, To Paradise first tending, when behold SATAN in likeness of an Angel bright Betwixt the CENTAURE and the SCORPION stearing His ZENITH, while the Sun in ARIES rose: Disguis'd he came, but those his Children dear Thir Parent soon discern'd, though in disguise.
It was a little like a scorpion, but was not a scorpion, but far more horrible, and especially so, because there are no creatures anything like it in nature, and because it had appeared to me for a purpose, and bore some mysterious signification.