Scotism

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Scotism

(ˈskəʊtɪzəm)
n
(Philosophy) the doctrines of John Duns Scotus, esp those holding that philosophy and theology are independent. See haecceity
ˈScotist n, adj
Scoˈtistic adj

Sco•tism

(ˈskoʊ tɪz əm)

n.
the set of doctrines of Duns Scotus.
[1635–45]
Sco′tist, n.

Scotism

the philosophy of John Duns Scotus, medieval Scholastic, especially his proposal that philosophy and theology be made separate disciplines. — Scotist, n.Scotistic, Scotistical, adj.
See also: Philosophy
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References in periodicals archive ?
His topics are entitas: nominalism and self-individuation, haecceitas: the Scotistic rejection of the strong self-individuation thesis, forms and self-individuation, subjects as principles of the individuation of their accidents, matter: non-instantiability and self-individuation, quantity and self-individuation, actual existence and individuality, and the Thomistic theory of individuation.
Personal Identity, Common Good and Personal Responsibility: Several Considerations Arising from the Scotistic Confessional
To sum up: the articles contained in this volume deal mainly with three topics: Scotus's theory of will and freedom, the transmission of Scotistic ideas between the 14th and 17th centuries, and Suarez's doctrine of will, freedom and nature.
(26.) Short, William, "Pied Beauty: Gerard Manley Hopkins and the Scotistic View of Nature," in Franciscan Theology of the Environment: An Introductory Reader, ed.
(6) For a Scotistic discussion of this issue written after the
LABOOY, "Freedom and neurobiology: A scotistic account", en Zygon 2004 (39/4), 919-932; S.
These two can be understood to mark opposite ends of a spectrum of philosophic ideas, with Rorty maintaining an unbending skeptical nominalism on the one end and Neville arguing for a robust Scotistic realism on the other.
For countless people, chief navigator and compass maker, helping to move the Church forward from Junipero Serra's Scotistic inheritance into the twenty-first century.
Ward spends her longest chapters on sorting out how Hopkins adapted Scotus's notions to his own views of human personality, of cosmological order, of human perception, and of the meaning of Creation, Incarnation, and Real Presence in sacramental theology--all of these as perspectives needed to understand what Hopkins meant by "inscape" and "instress." Along the way Ward demonstrates how these notions underlie the verbal structures and formal patterns of many of Hopkins' mature poems, suggesting their pervasively Scotistic coloring: "His poems are permeated by a subtle and complex understanding of the relationship between linguistic structures and the world of experience.
At the same time, Peirce's movement toward Scotistic realism, while also real, was more nuanced than appears at first glance" (164).
We can put this in more Scotistic language as follows: Scotus holds that God does not necessarily act in accordance with right reason.
On the authors' reading, the Scotistic variety of voluntarism on offer is much more nuanced.