Scotland


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Scot·land

 (skŏt′lənd)
A constituent country of the United Kingdom comprising the northern part of the island of Great Britain as well as the Hebrides, Shetland Islands, and Orkney Islands. Inhabited by Picts in prehistoric times, parts of the region were subsequently settled by Anglo-Saxons, Gaels, and Scandinavians. In the ninth century most of Scotland was unified into one kingdom, but conflicts with England soon erupted, leading to a series of bloody wars. When James VI, son of Mary Queen of Scots, succeeded to the English throne in 1603, the two kingdoms were united. Scotland became a part of the kingdom of Great Britain by a parliamentary act of 1707. Edinburgh is the capital and Glasgow the largest city.

Scotland

(ˈskɒtlənd)
n
(Placename) a country that is part of the United Kingdom, occupying the north of Great Britain: the English and Scottish thrones were united under one monarch in 1603 and the parliaments in 1707: a separate Scottish parliament was established in 1999. Scotland consists of the Highlands in the north, the central Lowlands, and hilly uplands in the south; has a deeply indented coastline, about 800 offshore islands (mostly in the west), and many lochs. Capital: Edinburgh. Pop: 5 295 403 (2011 est). Area: 78 768 sq km (30 412 sq miles).

Scot•land

(ˈskɒt lənd)

n.
a division of the United Kingdom in the N part of Great Britain. 5,035,315; 30,412 sq. mi. (78,772 sq. km). Cap.: Edinburgh.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Scotland - one of the four countries that make up the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern IrelandScotland - one of the four countries that make up the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland; located on the northern part of the island of Great Britain; famous for bagpipes and plaids and kilts
curling - a game played on ice in which heavy stones with handles are slid toward a target
Bannockburn - a battle in which the Scots under Robert the Bruce defeated the English and assured the independence of Scotland
battle of Brunanburh, Brunanburh - a battle in 937 when Athelstan defeated the Scots
battle of Langside, Langside - (1568) Catholic forces supporting Mary Queen of Scots were routed by Protestants
Antonine Wall - a fortification 37 miles long across the narrowest part of southern Scotland (between the Firth of Forth and the Firth of Clyde); built in 140 to mark the frontier of the Roman province of Britain
Caledonian Canal - a canal in northern Scotland that links North Sea with the Atlantic Ocean; runs diagonally between Moray Firth at the northeastern end and Loch Linnhe at the southwestern end; now little used
dirk - a relatively long dagger with a straight blade
tawse - a leather strap for punishing children
Scots, Scots English, Scottish - the dialect of English used in Scotland
ceilidh - an informal social gathering at which there is Scottish or Irish folk music and singing and folk dancing and story telling
scunner - a strong dislike; "they took a scunner against the United States"
bap - a small loaf or roll of soft bread
haggis - made of sheep's or calf's viscera minced with oatmeal and suet and onions and boiled in the animal's stomach
Episcopal Church, Episcopal Church of Scotland - an autonomous branch of the Anglican Communion in Scotland
Cheviot Hills, Cheviots - a range of hills on the border between England and Scotland
Great Britain, GB - an island comprising England and Scotland and Wales
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
Cumbria - a former Celtic kingdom in northwestern England; the name continued to be used for the hilly northwestern region of England including the Lake District and the northern Pennines
Caledonia - the geographical area (in Roman times) to the north of the Antonine Wall; now a poetic name for Scotland
Highlands, Highlands of Scotland - a mountainous region of northern Scotland famous for its rugged beauty; known for the style of dress (the kilt and tartan) and the clan system (now in disuse)
Lowlands, Lowlands of Scotland - the southern part of Scotland that is not mountainous
Galloway - a district in southwestern Scotland
Aberdeen - a city in northeastern Scotland on the North Sea
Balmoral Castle - a castle in northeastern Scotland that is a private residence of the British sovereign
Lothian Region - a district in southeast central Scotland (south side of the Firth of Forth) and the location of Edinburgh
Glasgow - largest city in Scotland; a port on the Clyde in west central Scotland; one of the great shipbuilding centers of the world
Hebridean Islands, Hebridean Isles, Hebrides, Western Islands, Western Isles - a group of more than 500 islands off the western coast of Scotland
Orkney Islands - an archipelago of about 70 islands in the North Atlantic and North Sea off the northeastern coast of Scotland
Shetland, Shetland Islands, Zetland - an archipelago of about 100 islands in the North Atlantic off the north coast of Scotland
ben - a mountain or tall hill; "they were climbing the ben"
brae - a slope or hillside
Clyde - a river in western Scotland that flows from the southern uplands into the Firth of Clyde; navigable by oceangoing vessels as far as Glasgow
Europe - the 2nd smallest continent (actually a vast peninsula of Eurasia); the British use `Europe' to refer to all of the continent except the British Isles
firth - a long narrow estuary (especially in Scotland)
Firth of Clyde - a firth on the southwestern coast of Scotland emptying into the North Channel
Firth of Forth - a large firth on the east coast of Scotland and the estuary of the Forth River; location of Edinburgh
Forth, Forth River - a river in southern Scotland that flows eastward to the Firth of Forth
glen - a narrow secluded valley (in the mountains)
Loch Achray - a lake in central Scotland
Loch Linnhe - an inlet of the Atlantic Ocean on the western coast of Scotland
Loch Ness - a lake in the Scottish highlands; the largest body of fresh water in Great Britain
kelpie, kelpy - (Scottish folklore) water spirit in the form of a horse that likes to drown its riders

Scotland

noun north of the border, Caledonia (Latin), the land of the brave He inherited a castle in Scotland.
Related words
adjectives Scottish, Caledonian
Quotations
"O Flower of Scotland,"
"When will we see"
"Your like again"
"That fought and died for,"
"Your wee bit hill and glen,"
"And stood against him,"
"Proud Edward's Army,"
"And sent him homeward,"
"Tae think again" [Roy Williamson Flower of Scotland]
Translations
Skotsko
Skotland
Skotlando
Šotimaa
Skotlanti
Škotska
Skócia
スコットランド
스코틀랜드
Caledonia
Škótsko
Škotska
SkotlandSkottland
ประเทศสกอตแลนด์
nước Scotland

Scotland

[ˈskɒtlənd]
A. NEscocia f
B. CPD Scotland Yard N oficina central de la policía de Londres

Scotland

[ˈskɒtlənd] nÉcosse f
in Scotland → en Écosse
to Scotland → en Écosse
from Scotland
I'm from Scotland → Je suis écossais.

Scotland

nSchottland nt

Scotland

[ˈskɒtlənd] nla Scozia

Scotland

اِسْكُتْلانْدا Skotsko Skotland Schottland Σκωτία Escocia Skotlanti Écosse Škotska Scozia スコットランド 스코틀랜드 Schotland Skottland Szkocja Escócia Шотландия Skotland ประเทศสกอตแลนด์ İskoçya nước Scotland 苏格兰
References in classic literature ?
Dermody, the bailiff, possessed relatives in London, of whom he occasionally spoke, and relatives in Scotland, whom he never mentioned.
In six weeks' time he was placed in charge of a gentleman's estate on the eastern coast of Scotland, and was comfortably established with his mother and his daughter in a new home.
There, placed between two rivers on the borders of Scotland, but still on English soil, the tents of a little army extended.
To cross the Tyne, reach Scotland and rejoin Lord Montrose, who will not sell you.
I propose to take you and Alicia to-morrow morning to Scotland.
The journey to Scotland was a tedious, and perhaps a dangerous, undertaking.
So far, I suppose, you are willing to admit that you gentlemen down at Scotland Yard have not exactly distinguished yourselves.
I have come over here in accordance with instructions received from headquarters - in fact from Scotland Yard.
Of the three the last is perhaps the most interesting, because the story happened partly in Scotland and partly in Ireland, and it is found both in old Irish and in old Scottish manuscripts.
I have a Relation in Scotland (said Sophia to me as we left London) who I am certain would not hesitate in receiving me.
Its subject was the so-called Black Museum at Scotland Yard; and from the catchpenny text we first learned that the gruesome show was now enriched by a special and elaborate exhibit known as the Raffles Relics.
Now you are back again in Scotland, what are you going to do?