Scots


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Related to Scots: Scots language, Scots Irish

Scots

 (skŏts)
adj.
Scottish. See Usage Note at Scottish.
n.
The language traditionally spoken by people living in the Lowlands of Scotland. Scots is sometimes classified as a variety of English and sometimes as a separate language.

[Middle English scottis, variant of scottisc, Scottish, from Scotte, sing. of Scottes, Scotsmen; see Scot.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Scots

(skɒts)
adj
1. (Peoples) of, relating to, or characteristic of Scotland, its people, their English dialects, or their Gaelic language
2. (Languages) of, relating to, or characteristic of Scotland, its people, their English dialects, or their Gaelic language
3. (Placename) of, relating to, or characteristic of Scotland, its people, their English dialects, or their Gaelic language
n
(Languages) any of the English dialects spoken or written in Scotland. See also Lallans
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Scots

(skɒts)

n.
1. any of the dialects of English spoken historically in the Lowlands of Scotland: influenced increasingly by the English of S England since the late 16th century.
adj.
[1325–75; syncopated form of Scottis]
usage: See Scotch.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Scots

A Celtic people from northern Ireland colonizing Argyll in the 5th century and giving their name to Scotland.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Scots - the dialect of English used in ScotlandScots - the dialect of English used in Scotland
English, English language - an Indo-European language belonging to the West Germanic branch; the official language of Britain and the United States and most of the commonwealth countries
Lallans, Scottish Lallans - a dialect of English spoken in the Lowlands of Scotland
Scotland - one of the four countries that make up the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland; located on the northern part of the island of Great Britain; famous for bagpipes and plaids and kilts
Adj.1.Scots - of or relating to or characteristic of Scotland or its people or culture or its English dialect or Gaelic language; "Scots Gaelic"; "the Scots community in New York"; "`Scottish' tends to be the more formal term as in `The Scottish Symphony' or `Scottish authors' or `Scottish mountains'"; "`Scotch' is in disfavor with Scottish people and is used primarily outside Scotland except in such frozen phrases as `Scotch broth' or `Scotch whiskey' or `Scotch plaid'"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

Scots

adjective Scottish, Caledonian Scots law differs in many respects from English law.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
skotskýskotština
skotsk
skotlantilainen
škotski
skót nyelvjárás
スコットランドの
스코틀랜드의
škótskyškótština
skotsk
เกี่ยวกับสกอตแลนด์
thuộc Scotland

Scots

[skɒts]
A. ADJescocés
a Scots accentun acento escocés
Scots pinepino m escocés
B. N (Ling) → escocés m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Scots

[ˈskɒts]
adjécossais(e)
a Scots accent → un accent écossais
n (= language) → écossais
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Scots

adjschottisch
n (= dialect)Schottisch nt; the Scots (= people)die Schotten pl

Scots

:
Scots law
nschottisches Recht
Scotsman
nSchotte m
Scots pine
nFöhre f, → (gemeine) Kiefer
Scotswoman
nSchottin f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

Scots

[skɒts] adjscozzese
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

Scots

اِسْكُتْلانْدِيّ skotský skotsk schottisch σκωτσέζικος escoceses skotlantilainen écossais škotski scozzese スコットランドの 스코틀랜드의 Schots skotsk szkocki escocês шотландский skotsk เกี่ยวกับสกอตแลนด์ İskoç thuộc Scotland 苏格兰的
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in classic literature ?
"Our business is with the Scots," quoth the elder; "for it was the Scots who cut off daddy's string fingers and his thumbs."
"You have borne arms against the Scots, then?" he asked.
Nicholson himself had a great fund of humour, of the Scots order - intellectual, turning on the observation of men; his own character, for instance - if he could have seen it in another - would have been a rare feast to him; but his son's empty guffaws over a broken plate, and empty, almost light-hearted remarks, struck him with pain as the indices of a weak mind.
What these are (and in spite of their grim name they are quite innocent) no array of terms would render thinkable to the merely English intelligence; but to the Scot they often prove unctuously nourishing, and Mr.
The company consisted of people of several nations, but there were above sixty of them merchants or inhabitants of Moscow, though of them some were Livonians; and to our particular satisfaction, five of them were Scots, who appeared also to be men of great experience in business, and of very good substance.
One of the Scots merchants of Moscow happened to be amongst us; and as soon as he heard the horn, he told us that we had nothing to do but to charge them without loss of time; and drawing us up in a line, he asked if we were resolved.
"Not much; the words of my class poem kept running through my head, and the accompaniments of the songs; and worse than anything, Mary Queen of Scots' prayer in Latin; it seemed as if
Wi the Scots lords at his feit." And now, just to end this chapter, let me give you one more poem.
From 1760 to 1763 Macpherson, then a young Highland Scots schoolmaster, published in rapid succession certain fragments of Gaelic verse and certain more extended works in poetical English prose which, he asserted, were part of the originals, discovered by himself, and translations, of the poems of the legendary Scottish bard Ossian, of the third Christian century.
Beyond the river was an advanced post belonging to Monk's army, which watched the enemy; it was composed of one hundred and fifty Scots. They had swum across the Tweed, and, in case of attack, were to recross it in the same manner, giving the alarm; but as there was no post at that spot, and as Lambert's soldiers were not so prompt at taking to the water as Monk's were, the latter appeared not to have much uneasiness on that side.
Kennedy's countenance strikingly recalled that of Herbert Glendinning, as Sir Walter Scott has depicted it in "The Monastery"; his stature was above six feet; full of grace and easy movement, he yet seemed gifted with herculean strength; a face embrowned by the sun; eyes keen and black; a natural air of daring courage; in fine, something sound, solid, and reliable in his entire person, spoke, at first glance, in favor of the bonny Scot.
You only know the shell of a Scot until you have entered his home circle; in his office, in clubs, at social gatherings where you and he seem to be getting on so well he is really a house with all the shutters closed and the door locked.