Scots pine

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Related to Scots pines: Pinus sylvestris

Scots pine

n.
A pine tree (Pinus sylvestris) having twisted needles arranged in fascicles of two and valued for timber and as an ornamental. It is native to Eurasia and is widely planted in North America. Also called Scotch pine.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Scots pine

or

Scotch pine

n
1. (Plants) a coniferous tree, Pinus sylvestris, of Europe and W and N Asia, having blue-green needle-like leaves and brown cones with a small prickle on each scale: a valuable timber tree
2. (Forestry) the wood of this tree
Official name: Scots fir or Scotch fir
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Scots pine - medium large two-needled pine of northern Europe and Asia having flaking red-brown barkScots pine - medium large two-needled pine of northern Europe and Asia having flaking red-brown bark
pine, pine tree, true pine - a coniferous tree
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

Scots pine

npino silvestre
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Felling of three scots pines and crown reduction to two scots pines at 23 Acer Crescent, Paisley ?Formation of a dormer to the rear of 55 Turnhill Drive, Erskine ?Sub division and part change of use from tanning salon (Class 2) to amusement arcade (Sui Generis) at Unit A, 46 High Street, Johnstone ?
Trevor Beale, 58, has admitted two charges of contravening tree preservation regulations on two Scots pines at a previous hearing at Bournemouth crown court.
It is enscribed with the words: "This stone of Scottish granite, together with the stand of Scots pines behind it, commemorates all those who have served since 1945, and especially those killed or who have died in operational theatres, in The Royal Regiment of Scotland and its Antecedent Regiments - The Royal Scots, The Royal Highland Fusiliers, The King's Own Scottish Borderers, The Black Watch, The Highlanders, The Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, 52nd Lowland Regiment and 51st Highland Regiment, Queen's Own Highlanders, The Gordon Highlanders, The Cameronians, Seaforth Highlanders, The Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders, The Royal Scots Fusiliers and The Highland Light Infantry."
Although local Scots pines have access to abundant nutrients because their canopies are limited from heavy browsing, these trees presumably invest in regrowth of a few large shoots.
"Since being planted in the 1870s, our Scots pines have thankfully been left alone and are now part of the landscape.
The purpose of an earlier visit that Ann and I had made to this area was to say hello to one of the oldest Scots pines (Pinus sylvestris) in Scotland.
Scots pines grow into an infinite variety of shapes.
In September 2005 three Scots pines with a similar habitus of the crown were selected in each sample plot for analysis so that they would represent average trees within each sample plot.
The average Zn concentration of all investigated Scots pines was equal to 7.22 [+ or -] 3.98 mg x [kg.sup.-1] and the median Zn concentration was 6.55 mg x [kg.sup.-1] (n = 165 d.w.).
FIVE Star Junior is proving a real money spinner for his new connections and completed a dazzling fourtimer in the Scots Pines Handicap at Lingfield.
They strip bark from trees such as beeches, oaks, poplars and Scots pines."
``We propose that as the Corsican pines disappear they are replaced with Scots pines that would encourage squirrels to come.