Scotsman


Also found in: Thesaurus, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

Scots·man

 (skŏts′mən)
n.
1. A man who is a native or inhabitant of Scotland. See Usage Note at Scottish.
2. A man of Scottish ancestry.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Scotsman

(ˈskɒtsmən)
n, pl -men
(Peoples) a native or inhabitant of Scotland
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Scots•man

(ˈskɒts mən)

n., pl. -men.
a native or inhabitant of Scotland; Scot.
[1325–75]
usage: See Scotch.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Scotsman - a native or inhabitant of ScotlandScotsman - a native or inhabitant of Scotland  
Scotland - one of the four countries that make up the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland; located on the northern part of the island of Great Britain; famous for bagpipes and plaids and kilts
European - a native or inhabitant of Europe
Scotchwoman, Scotswoman - a woman who is a Scot
Glaswegian - an inhabitant of Glasgow
Highland Scot, Scottish Highlander, Highlander - a native of the Highlands of Scotland
Lowland Scot, Lowlander, Scottish Lowlander - a native of the Lowlands of Scotland
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
Skot
skotte
skotlantilainen mies
Škot
スコットランド人男性
스코틀랜드 사람
skotte
ชายชาวสกอต
đàn ông Scotland

Scotsman

[ˈskɒtsmən] N (Scotsmen (pl)) → escocés m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Scotsman

[ˈskɒtsmən] nÉcossais m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Scotsman

[ˈskɒtsmən] n (-men (pl)) → scozzese m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

Scotsman

اِسْكُتْلانْدِيّ Skot skotte Schotte Σκώτος escocés skotlantilainen mies Écossais Škot scozzese スコットランド人男性 스코틀랜드 사람 Schot skotte Szkot escocês шотландец skotte ชายชาวสกอต İskoç đàn ông Scotland 苏格兰男人
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in classic literature ?
There were once a Scotsman and an Englishman and an Irishman serving in the army together, who took it into their heads to run away on the first opportunity they could get.
When nightfall and the time of the wild beasts came upon these, the Englishman happened to climb up into the very same tree on which the Scotsman was when he got a sight of the castle; and as soon as the day began to dawn and the Englishman looked to the four quarters of heaven, what did he see but the castle too!
The second Scotsman was for setting fire to the hut, and knocking the creatures that were there on the head when they came out; but I could not join with that; I was against killing them, if it were possible to avoid it.
By that time the other Scotsman and my man, taking charge of the two men already bound, and tied together also by the arm, led them away to the idol, and left them there, to see if their idol would relieve them, making haste back to us.
First, we daubed him all over, and his robes also, with tar, and tallow mixed with brimstone; then we stopped his eyes and ears and mouth full of gunpowder, and wrapped up a great piece of wildfire in his bonnet; then sticking all the combustibles we had brought with us upon him, we looked about to see if we could find anything else to help to burn him; when my Scotsman remembered that by the hut, where the men were, there lay a heap of dry forage; away he and the other Scotsman ran and fetched their arms full of that.
He knew there was a vast world outside, to whom Disruption Principles were as the chatter of tree-top apes; the paper brought him chill whiffs from it; he had met Englishmen who had asked lightly if he did not belong to the Church of Scotland, and then had failed to be much interested by his elucidation of that nice point; it was an evil, wild, rebellious world, lying sunk in DOZENEDNESS, for nothing short of a Scots word will paint this Scotsman's feelings.
So a safe-conduct or passport was necessary for any Scotsman who would travel through England in safety.
Philip had great faith in him, partly because he was a Scotsman and therefore by nature cautious, and partly because he had been right before.
Will he dare to tell the hot- blooded Scotsman that his children are left without a guide, though Magua promised to be one?"
"We say, 'Proud as a Scotsman,'" murmured the Duke of Buckingham.
The bewhiskered individual, who looked like a Scotsman, had the Teutonic name of Von Blix, and spoke with a strong American accent.
You insisted upon the advantages which the Scotsman possessed, from the very recent existence of that state of society in which his scene was to be laid.