Scott


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Related to Scott: Walter Scott, Scott Fitzgerald

Scott

 (skŏt), Dred 1795?-1858.
American slave who sued unsuccessfully for his liberty after spending four years with his master in a territory where slavery had been banned by the Missouri Compromise. The resulting decision by the US Supreme Court (1857) declared the Missouri Compromise unconstitutional.

Scott

, Robert Falcon 1868-1912.
British explorer who reached the South Pole (January 1912) only to find that Roald Amundsen had discovered the spot one month before. He and his companions died on the return journey.

Scott

, Sir Walter 1771-1832.
British writer of ballads and historical novels, a genre he popularized and refined. His works include Waverley (1814) and Ivanhoe (1819).

Scott

, Winfield 1786-1866.
American general. A hero of the War of 1812, he captured Veracruz, defeated Santa Anna, and captured Chapultepec during the Mexican War (1846-1848).

Scott

(skɒt)
n
1. (Biography) Adam (Derek). born 1980, Australian golfer: first Australian to win the US Masters (2013)
2. (Biography) Sir George Gilbert. 1811–78, British architect, prominent in the Gothic revival. He restored many churches and cathedrals and designed the Albert Memorial (1863) and St Pancras Station (1865)
3. (Biography) his grandson, Sir Giles Gilbert. 1880–1960, British architect, whose designs include the Anglican cathedral in Liverpool (1904–78) and the new Waterloo Bridge (1939–45)
4. (Biography) Paul (Mark). 1920–78, British novelist, who is best known for the series of novels known as the "Raj Quartet": The Jewel in the Crown (1966), The Day of the Scorpion (1968), The Towers of Silence (1972), and A Division of the Spoils (1975). Staying On (1977) won the Booker Prize
5. (Biography) Sir Peter (Markham). 1909–89, British naturalist, wildlife artist, and conservationist, noted esp for his paintings of birds. He founded (1946) the Slimbridge refuge for waterfowl in Gloucestershire
6. (Biography) his father, Robert Falcon. 1868–1912, British naval officer and explorer of the Antarctic. He commanded two Antarctic expeditions (1901–04; 1910–12) and reached the South Pole on Jan 18, 1912, shortly after Amundsen; he and the rest of his party died on the return journey
7. (Biography) Sir Walter. 1771–1832, Scottish romantic novelist and poet. He is remembered chiefly for the "Waverley" historical novels, including Waverley (1814), Rob Roy (1817), The Heart of Midlothian (1818), inspired by Scottish folklore and history, and Ivanhoe (1819), Kenilworth (1821), Quentin Durward (1823), and Redgauntlet (1824). His narrative poems include The Lay of the Last Minstrel (1805), Marmion (1808), and The Lady of the Lake (1810)

Scott

(skɒt)

n.
1. Dred, 1795?–1858, a black slave whose suit for freedom (1857) was denied by the U.S. Supreme Court.
2. Robert Falcon, 1868–1912, British naval officer and explorer.
3. Sir Walter, 1771–1832, Scottish author.
4. Winfield, 1786–1866, U.S. general.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Scott - award-winning United States film actor (1928-1999)
2.Scott - English explorer who reached the South Pole just a month after AmundsenScott - English explorer who reached the South Pole just a month after Amundsen; he and his party died on the return journey (1868-1912)
3.Scott - United States general who was a hero of the War of 1812 and who defeated Santa Anna in the Mexican War (1786-1866)Scott - United States general who was a hero of the War of 1812 and who defeated Santa Anna in the Mexican War (1786-1866)
4.Scott - British author of historical novels and ballads (1771-1832)Scott - British author of historical novels and ballads (1771-1832)
5.Scott - United States slave who sued for liberty after living in a non-slave stateScott - United States slave who sued for liberty after living in a non-slave state; caused the Supreme Court to declare the Missouri Compromise unconstitutional (1795?-1858)
References in classic literature ?
THE 15th of August 1771 was a lucky day for all the boys and girls and grown-up people too of the English-speaking race, for on that day Walter Scott was born in Edinburgh.
Everything was done that could be done to restore the lost power, and although it was partly regained, Scott walked with a limp to the end of his days.
Scott, you can't break 'm apart that way," Matt said at last.
He paused beside Scott and touched him on the shoulder, saying ominously:
Here one of the party, by the name of Scott, was taken ill; and his companions came to a halt, until he should recover health and strength sufficient to proceed.
On the ensuing summer, these very individuals visiting these parts in company with others, came suddenly upon the bleached bones and grinning skull of a human skeleton, which, by certain signs they recognized for the remains of Scott.
Scott strolled after him, with a queer look on his face.
John Brooke laughed then as he never dared to laugh afterward, and the derisive Scott smiled involuntarily as he heard the hearty peal, which put the finishing stroke to poor Meg's woe.
Its politics were strongly liberal, and to oppose it the Tory 'Quarterly Review' was founded in 1808, under the editorship of the satirist William Gifford and with the cooperation of Sir Walter Scott, who withdrew for the purpose from his connection with the 'Edinburgh.
Sir Walter Scott = British novelist and poet (1771-1832), often compared with Cooper--I have not located his definition of "vulgar"}
Consigning his heavier burden to the care of Tom Scott when he reached the street, taking a dram from the bottle for his own encouragement, and giving the boy a rap on the head with it as a small taste for himself, Quilp very deliberately led the way to the wharf, and reached it at between three and four o'clock in the morning.
These are the documents in the extraordinary case of the Gloria Scott, and this is the message which struck Justice of the Peace Trevor dead with horror when he read it.