Scott


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Related to Scott: Walter Scott, Scott Fitzgerald

Scott

 (skŏt), Dred 1795?-1858.
American slave who sued unsuccessfully for his liberty after spending four years with his master in a territory where slavery had been banned by the Missouri Compromise. The resulting decision by the US Supreme Court (1857) declared the Missouri Compromise unconstitutional.

Scott

, Robert Falcon 1868-1912.
British explorer who reached the South Pole (January 1912) only to find that Roald Amundsen had discovered the spot one month before. He and his companions died on the return journey.

Scott

, Sir Walter 1771-1832.
British writer of ballads and historical novels, a genre he popularized and refined. His works include Waverley (1814) and Ivanhoe (1819).

Scott

, Winfield 1786-1866.
American general. A hero of the War of 1812, he captured Veracruz, defeated Santa Anna, and captured Chapultepec during the Mexican War (1846-1848).
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Scott

(skɒt)
n
1. (Biography) Adam (Derek). born 1980, Australian golfer: first Australian to win the US Masters (2013)
2. (Biography) Sir George Gilbert. 1811–78, British architect, prominent in the Gothic revival. He restored many churches and cathedrals and designed the Albert Memorial (1863) and St Pancras Station (1865)
3. (Biography) his grandson, Sir Giles Gilbert. 1880–1960, British architect, whose designs include the Anglican cathedral in Liverpool (1904–78) and the new Waterloo Bridge (1939–45)
4. (Biography) Paul (Mark). 1920–78, British novelist, who is best known for the series of novels known as the "Raj Quartet": The Jewel in the Crown (1966), The Day of the Scorpion (1968), The Towers of Silence (1972), and A Division of the Spoils (1975). Staying On (1977) won the Booker Prize
5. (Biography) Sir Peter (Markham). 1909–89, British naturalist, wildlife artist, and conservationist, noted esp for his paintings of birds. He founded (1946) the Slimbridge refuge for waterfowl in Gloucestershire
6. (Biography) his father, Robert Falcon. 1868–1912, British naval officer and explorer of the Antarctic. He commanded two Antarctic expeditions (1901–04; 1910–12) and reached the South Pole on Jan 18, 1912, shortly after Amundsen; he and the rest of his party died on the return journey
7. (Biography) Sir Walter. 1771–1832, Scottish romantic novelist and poet. He is remembered chiefly for the "Waverley" historical novels, including Waverley (1814), Rob Roy (1817), The Heart of Midlothian (1818), inspired by Scottish folklore and history, and Ivanhoe (1819), Kenilworth (1821), Quentin Durward (1823), and Redgauntlet (1824). His narrative poems include The Lay of the Last Minstrel (1805), Marmion (1808), and The Lady of the Lake (1810)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Scott

(skɒt)

n.
1. Dred, 1795?–1858, a black slave whose suit for freedom (1857) was denied by the U.S. Supreme Court.
2. Robert Falcon, 1868–1912, British naval officer and explorer.
3. Sir Walter, 1771–1832, Scottish author.
4. Winfield, 1786–1866, U.S. general.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Scott - award-winning United States film actor (1928-1999)
2.Scott - English explorer who reached the South Pole just a month after AmundsenScott - English explorer who reached the South Pole just a month after Amundsen; he and his party died on the return journey (1868-1912)
3.Scott - United States general who was a hero of the War of 1812 and who defeated Santa Anna in the Mexican War (1786-1866)Scott - United States general who was a hero of the War of 1812 and who defeated Santa Anna in the Mexican War (1786-1866)
4.Scott - British author of historical novels and ballads (1771-1832)Scott - British author of historical novels and ballads (1771-1832)
5.Scott - United States slave who sued for liberty after living in a non-slave stateScott - United States slave who sued for liberty after living in a non-slave state; caused the Supreme Court to declare the Missouri Compromise unconstitutional (1795?-1858)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
THE 15th of August 1771 was a lucky day for all the boys and girls and grown-up people too of the English-speaking race, for on that day Walter Scott was born in Edinburgh.
Everything was done that could be done to restore the lost power, and although it was partly regained, Scott walked with a limp to the end of his days.
Scott, you can't break 'm apart that way," Matt said at last.
"Won't some of you help?" Scott cried desperately at the crowd.
Wide prairies Vegetable productions Tabular hills Slabs of sandstone Nebraska or Platte River Scanty fare Buffalo skulls Wagons turned into boats Herds of buffalo Cliffs resembling castles The chimney Scott's Bluffs Story connected with them The bighorn or ahsahta Its nature and habits Difference between that and the "woolly sheep," or goat of the mountains
They have received the name of Scott's Bluffs, from a melancholy circumstance.
Scott strolled after him, with a queer look on his face.
All the greatest of these writers were poets, wholly or in part, and they fall roughly into two groups: first, William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Robert Southey, and Walter Scott; and second, about twenty years younger, Lord Byron, Percy Bysshe Shelley, and John Keats.
"Not in Sir Walter Scott's signification, my dear," answered Julia laughing, "for it is not so very COMMON.
Consigning his heavier burden to the care of Tom Scott when he reached the street, taking a dram from the bottle for his own encouragement, and giving the boy a rap on the head with it as a small taste for himself, Quilp very deliberately led the way to the wharf, and reached it at between three and four o'clock in the morning.
These are the documents in the extraordinary case of the Gloria Scott, and this is the message which struck Justice of the Peace Trevor dead with horror when he read it."
Moore, I could manage better; and when my father read "Lalla Rookh" to my mother I sat up to listen, and entered into all the woes of Iran in the story of the "Fire Worshippers." I drew the line at the "Veiled Prophet of Khorassan," though I had some sense of the humor of the poet's conception of the critic in "Fadladeen." But I liked Scott's poems far better, and got from Ispahan to Edinburgh with a glad alacrity of fancy.